Kathleen
22 May 2016 @ 11:08 am
All my fanfics.

Days turned into weeks, weeks turned into months. And then, one not so very special day, I went to my typewriter, I sat down, and I wrote our story. A story about a time, a story about a place, a story about the people. But above all things, a story about love. )
 
 
feeling: working
calliope tune: "The Gallant Shearers"-Tannahill Weavers
 
 
 
 
Kathleen
27 January 2016 @ 03:10 am
The X-Files, my childhood love, is back for a tenth season after all these years, and I'm happily wallowing in nostalgia. It's a complete delight so far, with all the old faces, easter eggs, and parallels to the past episodes, along with the original intro and theme. "My Struggle" is an interesting, although flawed start. The actors take a bit to get into their roles again - Scully by the end of the first episode, Mulder by the second - although Skinner is as if he never left. I also loved the glimpse of the Cigarette Smoking Man at the end. It made me sad to see Mulder so skeptical and jaded, even though it makes sense after all these years, and I actually winced when he tore the I want to believe poster. But the scene where his face light up when he sees the spaceship was so Mulder I teared up. "Founder's Mutation" is a superb blend of the myth arc and monster of the week, with a sympathetic monster, and a heartbreaking subplot featuring Mulder and Scully's daydreams about if they'd kept William, all of which, especially the forehead kisses, had me sobbing. "Mulder and Scully Meet the Were-Monster" is pure comedy, and despite how much I hated the original 100% comedy episodes, it works, helped along by the offbeat and hilarious premise of a monster who is bitten by a human and becomes human when the moon comes out. The character was great fun - I also loved the puppy, I adored seeing Mulder slowly becoming a believer again, and the theme being his ringtone was flawless. "Home Again" is a gut-wrenching subplot against an intriguing concept. It's not carried off perfectly and the storylines don't fit perfectly together, but they both impact emotionally, especially in the flashbacks. "Babylon" seems to have been greatly disliked by most, but I rather enjoyed it. The guest characters, especially Miller, were enjoyable, the concept intriguing, and I never knew how much I needed Mulder dancing to country western music in a stetson. I was very sad how little screentime the Lone Gunmen got, though, and that they were only a hallucination. "My Struggle II", is excellent, making my wish the whole season could have been a miniseries of the plot, rather than just the first and final episodes. I've always preferred the mythology arc episodes to the stand alone, and it's fun to finally see the Syndicate's endgame after all these years. It was a delight to see Mulder and the Cigarette Smoking Man interact again. As much as I love to hate CSM, and as proud as I am of Mulder for not taking his deal, I've always found their dynamic fascinating, with that strange mix of father-son relationship against hatred and so much evil committed. It was wonderful to have Miller back - I adored his scenes with Mulder - and Einstein grew on me a lot compared to last episode, even if her skepticism is far more annoying than Scully's ever was. I've never been a big Reyes fan, but it was nice to see her again, even if she seemed desperately out of character. I just can't believe Reyes would ever ally herself with CSM, and especially not for the selfish reason of saving her own life, even if she did give Scully the information she needed to help everyone sick. I was incredibly sad that Doggett didn't even get a mention, though, as part of me had always hoped, even if I didn't ship it, that Reyes and he ended up together, since it might have made him happy. I loved the opening of alien!Scully, as well as Scully being the key to saving the world - Mulder's line about thanking the CSM for saving her and CSM commenting on her being Mulder's weakness made my shipper heart melt - but the cliffhanger ending left me screeching and desperate for more. Overall, weak spots aside, I enjoyed the season, and it was so wonderful and nostalgic to have my childhood babies back on my screen.

Once Upon A Time is back for the second half of season five with a mythology arc, and while nothing like what I'd expected I'm enjoying most of it so far. I love seeing this new version of Emma,still strong and brave, but no longer closed off and hurting, now determined to save Killian and fight for their future. I was never a big Neal fan, but I was glad she finally got closure with him. Killian, always being whumped, is already breaking my heart, even though I love seeing his faith in Emma and knowing she was coming for him. I liked seeing the origins of Liam and he entering the Navy and first seeing the Jolly Rodger. I was a little sad about Liam's deal with Hades, but did love him sticking by his brother and doing the right thing in the end, earning himself a happy afterlife and closure with Killian. Killian and Emma's goodbye broke me, but their reunion, and Killian finally coming back to life, was the most beautiful scene ever. The little kisses Emma gave him had me giggling and grinning. Emma has grown so much since she took her walls down, and I adored seeing them back together, as well as Emma finally admitting, without anything bad having to happen, that she loved him. I adored Charming hugging Killian, as well as trying to save him from Mr. Hyde. Snow White is delightful so far, finally getting to be the character I loved in season one again, and I love Charming and her moments together and with baby Neal. I adored her calling Killian by his first name and acting motherly toward him. Her friendship with Hercules was a surprise delight and I only wish we could see more of him. I liked Meg, too, who, while very different from the Disney version, was a sweet character. Hades, never one of my favorite Disney villains, is a mix of annoying and truly scary, even if the flaming hair makes me snicker. I also despised his romance with Zelena, and was delighted when she killed him. Surprisingly Zelena, once my least favorite character, has grown on me quite a bit, largely due to her love for her baby, and the fact that she's a lot nicer with her memories back. I also enjoy her new relationship with Regina. I teared up during Regina's goodbye to her father - and loved that Henry got to meet him - as well as her closure with Daniel. I liked her getting closure with her mother, but was annoyed Cora, after all the horrible things she did, got redeemed for doing so little to make amends. I'm broken over Robin Hood's death, as well as what it means to Regina, and leaving poor little Roland an orphan, but I loved that Regina didn't revert back to the Evil Queen, and even attempted to destroy her other half, showing how much she's grown. I adore that Rumplestiltskin and Belle are finally having a baby, and Rumple's instant willingness to do whatever he had to to protect the baby breaks my heart and gives me Rumple and Bae feels all over again - if seeing them in the flashback wasn't heart-tugging enough! I did like that he showed remorse at sending Milah into the river, too, even if I despise Milah and honestly didn't care that he did it. But I appreciate that Rumplestiltskin has seemingly come to terms with his darkness and found a balance between his love for Belle and his power, something I hope Belle will eventually come around to, as I want so much to see them and their baby as a family. I love Belle but she's frustrating me so far this season, pulling away from Rumplestiltskin when, in this case, he's actually doing the right thing, being honest with her and himself, and trying to save their baby. I'm also incredibly sad that True Love's Kiss didn't work to wake her, after Rumplestiltskin was willing to give up who he is to try it. The season finale introduces a new and intriguing world, the Land of Untold Stories, with a delightful cameo by the Three Musketeers, a tantalizing hint at Agrabah, and new characters in the introduction of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. I love the steampunk feel of the world and characters, and the concept of characters being able to split off their evil sides is intriguing, leaving me excited for season six.

The Musketeers has completed its third and final season, and despite a few things that felt rushed or forced, I enjoyed every moment. The series finally hit its stride and settled into its characters even more than the previous seasons, all of whom have grown so much. I adored that everyone got a happy ending, especially Aramis, D'Artagnan and Constance (I was so afraid for all of them), and Aramis and Anne's little son was absolutely adorable. I also loved Porthos getting a love interest, and a little family all at once. I wasn't incredibly fond of Sylvie at first - I greatly enjoy Athos and Milady's relationship, felt Sylive and Athos's came out of left field, and aren't very fond of Athos in general, and less so this season - but she grew on me, and seemed to make Athos a better person. I was surprisingly pleased with the villains this season, compared to my hatred - and not in a love to hate way - of the last two season's, with each one unique, and some even strangely sympathetic, like the King's ill-fated brother. I was saddened to lose both the King and Treville, but did love seeing Milady again, even if only for a couple episodes. I also adored the baby Musketeer - I never did get his name - and was so happy he survived and ended up becoming a full-fledged Musketeer in the end.

I watched The Living and the Dead, and while it wasn't at all what I was expecting, I completely fell in love with it. The acting was superb, the music, scenery, and cinematography all breathtaking, and the plot had a gorgeous Gothic feel that delighted me, as well as shocking me with the twists. I liked the themes of growth and healing, as well as realizing one's own limitations, and Nathan and Charlotte's relationship was both adorable and heartbreaking yet realistic. I loved the poignancy of the episodes, and how the writers didn't shy away from tragedy and darkness, while still leaving a glimmer of hope. I also had no idea how much I needed to see Colin Morgan holding a baby until now.

Zoo is on season two, and it's a surprisingly emotional and jarring ride from season one's fluffy outrageous tone. I'm not happy with the changes in Jamie's character - I get that she suffered a lot but becoming a murderous psycho, and lashing out at Mitch who fought the hardest to save her, seems wildly out of character. Logan was an interesting, although completely under-used and largely pointless character. who didn't seem to quite deserve the horrible ending he got. I'm broken over Chloe's senseless death (and the destruction of my otp), and Dariela irks me endlessly - I despise her instant romance with Abe, as much as I want him to get a *nice* love interest. But, on the bright side there's snarky as usual Mitch and Abraham and Jackson's heart-warming friendship to fill the void. I also adore that we're finally getting backstory on Jackson, including flashbacks to his sad childhood, and, while I'm worried and so sad for him, I'm very interesting in his story arc this season as he slowly mutates. I love the new and creative animals this season, especially the adorable Moe the jellyfish, and the electric ants.

I've started watching Roswell again, a show I faintly remember from my childhood, and falling in love with it. Max and Liz's star-crossed, alien/human love story hits all my tropes, and it's easy to also root for Michael and Maria's romance. I love Max, who projects the perfect mixture of sad vulnerability and other-worldliness, and Michael continues to break my heart. I also surprisingly even love the female characters, with Liz and Maria perfectly tolerable, and Isabel very likeable. I adore the way the characters, particularly the alien trio, form a makeshift family. While Kyle is a somewhat useless character, I did love his interactions with Max in the episode where they were both drunk, and hope for more scenes with the two of them. The Sheriff is a fascinating character, from a sympathetic villain to on their team, and I love his relationship with the kids. I love the theme and setting, especially the Crashdown, too. I'm not especially fond of Tess, as much as I like Emilie de Ravin, who feels like a plot device solely to create angst for Max and Liz, but I do love the realization of who and what the aliens are.

I binge-watched the complete series of Roar, and it was such a treat to plunge back into a Kiwi show again. They have such a lovely feel and warmth, and are so nostalgic to me. I adored the Celtic soundtrack, and the characters, for the most part, were all likeable, especially Conor. Molly annoys me a bit, but I love everyone else. I'm only sad the show didn't continue, because it grew on me more and more, and seemed to be getting better by the episode. The setting was also quite unique and very enjoyable.

I'm finally getting to watch the seasons of Gunsmoke I hadn't seen, starting with eight. Chester is in the show much less this season, sadly, but there's a new character in the form of half-Comanche blacksmith Quint, and so far he's both a delight and quite easy on the eyes. There's also the episode "Us Haggens" which introduces Festus, long before he'd become a regular. His voice is quite different, and he doesn't have all his quirks yet, nor his beloved Ruth, but I can see the roots of the character I'd learn to love, even then. I also found it interesting how he's likeable, but not quite as sweet and slightly more intelligent than the later character. Among other excellent episodes is the delightful and heart-tugging "I Call Him Wonder", a flawless prequel to one of my favorite later season episodes. By season eleven, Doc and Festus, now a regular, have a wonderful banter and friendship going, and I adored episodes like "Wishbone" where Festus cares for Doc who's been bitten by a snake, and another episode where Festus has been badly beaten up and Doc worries over him. Quint is sadly gone, though, replaced by Thad, the only character in the show I've ever disliked. In truth, Thad is harmless, although far from charismatic and very dull compared to all other deputies Matt had, but I've always had such an irrational loathing of him.

I'm on season four of Maverick now and it's a delight. I've always been unusual in that I've never cared for Bret and found his episodes far less interesting for the most part. Filling his place is cousin Beau who is fine so far, and Bart has a bit more episodes than usual, all of which are excellent.

New this season is The Shannara Chronicles, an absolute treasure so far. It's pulling heavy inspiration from Tolkien, but I don't mind because its old fantasy, and therefore different from most current tv and films that draw from more recent novels. It's undoubtedly one of the most gorgeous shows I've ever seen, with the lush backdrop of New Zealand mingled with tactful cgi and well-done filming, costumes, and props, all a richly detailed and offbeat blend of Medieval high fantasy merged with post-dystopian futurism. I love the beautiful opening credits which quickly explain the background and mythos of the series. The whole show has a slightly modernized tinge over the feel of the Kiwi shows of the '90s I grew up on, making me both happy and somewhat nostalgic at the same time. I love the vast majority of the characters, and nearly all of the male ones, helped by a likable cast and the refreshing lack of common tropes in most of their personalities. Wil is a complete sweetheart, and its a joy to have a protagonist who is mostly inept at fighting, admits fear, sorrow, and horror, and would much rather be a healer than go on an epic quest. Allanon is fabulous, a perfect mix of dry wit and slightly spooky power; and I adore the writers for, once, not killing off the mentor character at first convenience. I love his relationship with Wil, and I'm always a sap for the magic comes at a cost trope. Ander is sweet, and I absolutely adore his relationship with Amberle, and have so many headcanons about how he poured all his love into her because of his father's rejection, brother's death, and his other brother's seeming indifference toward him. On a shallow note, his looks are absolutely stunning, too. Bandon is a precious baby, and I'm so worried for him, especially concerning his gift. I'm not fond of Eretria, but I appreciate the layers of her character, and the realism of a life of abuse having shaped her into what she is, while still showing flashes of a good, yet scarred heart beneath it all. Amberle seems sweet but I dislike her with Wil, and that seems to be half of her personality.

In other new shows there's Legends of Tomorrow, a delightfully zany and surprisingly emotional mash up of heroes that results in just about the most overtly comic book series I've ever seen. Snagged from other DC shows, I know most of the characters already, especially my baby, Ray, thankfully on a much better show and surrounded by a better cast, but still as precious and nerdy as ever. Heat Wave is growing on me a lot, and I already loved Captain Cold, Professor Stein, and Jax. The only brand new character is Rip Hunter and he's great so far, even if often exasperated and shady. AI Gideon is also fun.

Also new is Outsiders, an intriguing and highly unusual series. The characters are interesting and layered - I adore Asa, the setting - and contrast between the ways of life - is fascinating, and I enjoy the relationships, especially Hasil and Sally Ann.

Daredevil is back for season two, bringing with it all the unique things that set it apart from and make it more deeply thought-provoking than other superhero shows with its realism, haunting cinematography, long scenes of dialogue, and poignant character study as it fleshes out its characters and thankfully narrow setting. Added to the always fascinating supporting characters this season is Frank Castle, an intriguing and layered character. I loved his clashes and eventual alliance - including saving his life - with Matt, and despite his violent, morally grey actions, I enjoyed his more tender moments, such as his love for his family and dog. Also new is Elektra, a character I enjoyed in the movie, and is even better here, both in her own complex morality, and her poignant relationship with Matt. I loved seeing the priest, Claire, and Wilson Fisk again, and only wish they could have been in it more. While there were some things I found unnecessary or unwanted - Foggy and Matt's breakup rehash of season one, the less focused storyline, and especially the Matt/Karen forced and annoying romance angle - I loved so many moments, especially Matt getting his new sticks, and all the returning supporting characters. I was disappointed in Karen's character, which, while troubled and somewhat traumatized last season, was far more interesting and likable as opposed to how whiny and annoying she came across this season. Despite the forced chemistry at first, I grew to enjoy her scenes with Frank, and she seemed much more like her season one character with him.

I went to see X Men: Apocalypse in theatres, and it was fabulous, definitely my second or third favorite film of the series so far. Charles has finally stepped into the role of the kindly professor I loved, and his character growth is a delight to behold. I also enjoyed the unique explanation for how he ended up bald, even if I'm going to miss his fantastic hair. Erik breaks my heart, as usual, and the death of his family was devastatingly cruel - I so wanted to see more of his little daughter's animal mutation, and their scenes together were so touching and tender. I adored Charles and Erik's scenes together - their balance between friend and enemy is my favorite relationship in the series - and I inwardly shrieked when Erik swung to the X-Men's sides and dropped the huge metal X in front of Charles to protect him from Apocalypse. I also loved that the movie ended on a hopeful note for their relationship. Despite my reservations, I quickly grew to love the younger versions of the characters: Storm was fascinating, Scott was as precious as his adult version, and surprisingly, I liked Jean a lot more than the adult who I've never really cared for. I loved her saving Charles by unleashing her power, showing a flipped parallel to the darkness of her character in the original films. I'm horribly upset about Alex, though, and cling to the hope that he'll come back alive in some future film, since his body was never shown. Nightcrawler, a favorite of mine from the original films, was precious, and I adored every moment with him. Angel was a fascinating character, and I only wish there had been redemption for him, or at least more time, as his story seemed ripe for more exploration than it got. It was nice to see Mystique fully with the good guys by the end, and I love that she seems to be staying to train the new kids. Quicksilver was as much of a treasure as last movie, with a delightfully expanded role. I was a little disappointed he never told Erik he was his son, but his perfect mix of poignancy and quirky humor warmed my heart. His song sequence was endearing, and I was extremely worried when Apocalypse hurt him, but thankful when things ended happily for him. Apocalypse was an intriguing, although under-developed villain. I loved the concept of him - his gaining powers through body transference - and the few glimpses given of how he viewed the world, but he lacked full motivation for his actions. Wolverine's cameo was an unexpected and beautiful scene. I adored Jean giving him a memory, and the fact that he never spoke highlighted how good an actor Hugh Jackman is, with all the emotions he conveyed through his eyes.

I stumbled across Beyond the Prairie, and despite my reservations and few annoyances, mainly Laura being blonde - I'm far from a book purist on anything, but an absolute stickler than Laura must have brown hair - I enjoyed it quite a bit. It's pretty cute and a complete delight to see some of my favorite things from The Long Winter, my favorite book of the series, and the one thing I was always so sad the tv show didn't include. I've had a massive crush on Cap Garland since I was little, and despite him not being what I imagine I still shrieked like a schoolgirl at finally having him on my screen, even if only for a few short scenes. I also loved the inclusion of the blizzard, and Almanzo and Cap's journey for the wheat, especially Almanzo and Laura's adorable reunion scene. In other favorites, he voice over was lovely, Mary was sweet and I would have loved to see more of her, and baby Rose was so precious.

I watched The Huntsman: Winter's War and was left with mixed feelings. While I adored seeing the Huntsman again, and finally getting his backstory, I hated how much was retconned, particularly Ravenna's death and the Huntsman's wife. Female warriors are one of my least favorite type of characters, and I could see nothing in Sara's character that resembled Snow White as the first film implied. Freya was an unnecessary addition to the story, and greatly boring with the exception of the final few minutes that made me feel a bit of sympathy for her. Many of the other characters, like the other Huntsman, who I would have liked to see more of, were underused, and the dwarves were wasted in comic relief. The plor seemed overstuffed and muddled, and while pretty, failed to measure up to the beautifully dark and imaginative first movie. Saddest of all, to me, Snow White married the Prince, eliminating all the implications of the first movie that the Huntsman had taken that role, having been the one to kiss her awake.

In other new movies I watched Gods Of Egypt with low expectations, and ended up adoring it. It's very much a '90s style adventure story, with delightful fun, a lighter-hearted, more straight forward feel than most films today, and some wonderful friendship feels between Bek and Horus, whose relationship was my favorite thing in the movie. I enjoyed the somewhat fanciful but partially faithful depiction of mythological events, and how they wove into the story, like Horus's eyes. Horus was a lovely character, growing emotionally throughout the story until becoming a kind and good kind, and Bek was endearing. Next was the stunning and deeply moving Mr. Nobody. In addition to being one of the most beautifully filmed movies I've ever seen, it was incredibly thought-provoking, and a flawless mix of tragic poignancy and quiet inspiration. The cast was all superb - I'm absolutely in love with Jared Leto's eyes on a shallow note - and the plot was full of imagination. Next was the gorgeous On Drakon, a beautifully filmed and acted fairytale story with elements of Beauty and the Beast, but better. I've longed for human shape-shifted dragons in a fantasy for years and finally got one in Arman, a sweet and heartbreakingly sad character fighting his dragon side and the evil his race has committed. The mythology behind the dragons, especially their birth, was fascinating and dark, and I adored when the conclusion was him not becoming human but rather learning to control the dragon. The romance was sweet, and the ending so precious I couldn't stop smiling. Next was The Legend of Tarzan, the Tarzan movie I've been longing for for years. The tone was perfect, the cinematography and music gorgeous, and the relationship between Tarzan and Jane was the heart of it all, a beautiful, realistic, and powerful love story. I was a little saddened that there weren't more flashbacks, but I have an absolute weakness for married couples deeply in love, and the story hit so many of my beloved tropes. The ending was adorable, too. Next was the inspiring and lovely Hallmark movie Front of the Class. I loved that it was a true story, and James Wolk was so good at the role.

I discovered and have been watching the adorable and imaginative Tinkerbell animated film series, which fills out the backstory of the Peter Pan character. I love the world of Pixie Hollow, with all it's imaginative concepts - fairies painting ladybugs and stripes on bumblebees and the flower bulbs with legs - and I love the other fairy characters, especially Terrence and the sweet little Fawn.
 
 
calliope tune: "Green Fields"-Brothers Four
feeling: hungry
 
 
 
 
 
Kathleen
The episode "Millennium" of The X-Files has always been one of my favorites so I was thrilled to discover it was a crossover with another show of the same title and by the creator of The X-Files. Millennium is a fascinating, much forgotten series in a different vein but with many of the same characteristics that make The X-Files so good. Frank Black, a former police detective who has the uncanny ability to see through the eyes of killers, is a sympathetic and incredibly human protagonist, and his relationship with his little daughter Jordan is adorably precious. The themesong and intro are beautiful, and the episodes, including the stunning "Kingdom Come", are poignant and haunting character studies exploring the motives behind crime. Other excellent episodes include "The Well-Worn Lock", a deeply moving look at a difficult issue, and the haunting "The Wild and The Innocent". I worked my way through season one and am completely captivated by the series. I'm on season two now and lamenting the format changes. The Millennium Group has transformed from good to edging into evil, growing more and more shady with each episode, Peter and Frank are beginning to drift apart, Frank snapped and actually killed a man, and Katherine has separated from Frank, taking Jordan with her, which means the cute father-daughter moments are few and far between and making even the Christmas episode leave a bittersweet taste. Also the lingering end times mythos of season one is more oppressive and far reaching, accounting for better than half of the episodes. Much of the spellbinding plots have been toned down, settling for often confusing and open-ended stories. Not to say there aren't some gems among the rest, though, like the poignant, thought-provoking "Luminary", one of the scant episodes to have a hopeful conclusion as well as an intriguing guest character, and the chilling "Monster" in which a troubled child accuses a daycare worker and Frank of abuse against the town's children and herself. The season's best is the stunning two-part "Owls"/"Roosters", a fascinating mix of religious treasure hunt and Nazi war history which brings some hope in Frank, Katherine, and Peter's separations. The finale was one of the most shocking and bold episodes I've seen on any show, leaving Peter's fate hanging in the balance, Katherine dead, and Frank left alone in a cabin, holding Jordan as everything falls apart. It was good in an intense and chilling way, and I'm more worried about Peter's fate than the loss of Katherine, even as surprised as I am that the writers chose to kill her off. I'm grateful Jordan was spared, though, as I don't think I could have handled that.

I'm on the ninth and last season of The X-Files, now, and the whole show just aches without Mulder. I love Doggett dearly, and he's wonderful, but everything makes me miss Mulder, especially the gloomy tone of the series as it winds down. Monica Reyes is now a regular, and while not one of my favorites by any means, I'm getting used to her. Sadly, the relationship, friendship or otherwise, between Scully and Doggett isn't explored further until halfway through the season, and most episodes team up Doggett and Reyes with Scully a third wheel. Still there's some unique ideas left, such as "4D" in which a murderer is able to shift between parallel worlds, shooting and paralyzing the parallel Doggett in this world and trapping the real Doggett in the parallel world. While Reyes's decision to let the parallel Doggett die to bring back the real one saddened me, I loved the concept of the episode, as well as the twists in the plot. Also there's the poignant "Trust No1" which expands on the supersoldiers story arc by showing they have a weakness, as well as building another chapter in the mystery of little William. The episode made me miss Mulder more than ever, and I wish he'd been in it, if only for a little bit. Doggett gets to shine as an amnesiac stranded in a Mexican town in "John Doe", and Robert Patrick does some incredible, heartbreaking acting throughout, especially during the scene where he relives his son's death. The disturbing "Hellbound" is also one of the season's most unusual and fascinating episodes about a murdered man reincarnated over and over to avenge his death. Doggett is brilliant again in the poignant and original "Audrey Pauley" which features a beautifully sad performance from the title character as well. "Jump The Shark" brings back some much needed humor to the show, and even returns The Lone Gunmen's Jimmy and Yves, but ends on a heartbreaking note when Byers, Langly, and Frohike are killed. I could have dealt with one of them dying, but all three was too much, and even though the writers spared Jimmy I sobbed over losing the others. I like to believe the comic book retcon and think the trio's deaths were faked and they survived. To make matters even worse, Scully gives little William up for adoption to protect him right after the child is cured of his powers. While the couple adopting him was sweet, I teared up through the episode, especially at the end, and it was just one blow too many. Still the episode brought Jeffrey Spender back, a character I grew to really like before his "death" a couple seasons ago, and even as badly hurt as he was, I was glad he survived. "Release" provides closure for Doggett over the loss of his son and Hayes is one of the most fascinating non-recurring characters in a long time. I'm conflicted on the finale "The Truth", though. On one hand there was a lot I loved: Monica's finest moment in all two seasons of her when she stands up to the court, Mulder and Scully together at the end in a bittersweet parallel of the pilot, Kerst helping Mulder finally, Spender and Mulder are confirmed to be half brothers, and all the cameos from past characters - the Lone Gunmen, X, Gibson Praise, Spender, Marita, and even Krycek which left me incredibly emotional and nostalgic. But there was so much more that was never tied up. Doggett and Reyes are left on the run, Mulder and Scully can't visit William, Gibson never can be safe, and the date of the invasion still looms over everyone.

I discovered the wonderful miniseries Alice, a brilliant updating of Alice In Wonderland. Andrew-Lee Potts was fabulous as the colorful Hatter, a completely different character except for an occasional flash where I saw Connor in him, and I loved his take on the role: a mix of quirkiness and sadness, but all completely adorable. I loved his relationship with Alice as she grows to trust and love him. Wonderland was incredibly reimagined and very clever, from the Looking Glass to the bottled and sold emotions, and I loved all the characters, especially the quite hilarious Charlie. After that I watched Tin Man, a clever reimagining of Oz. I loved Glitch dearly, and the brilliant way the tale was retold, with all the elements just dfferently put together. The ending was a little too sugary but I was glad DG and her friends and parents all survived, as well as Cain finding his son back. I also squeed a little over the fact that the parallels for Glinda and the Wizard - DG's mother and father - were married.

I finally got to see Man Of Steel and was left with mixed emotions. There were a lot of changes - I'd expected as much - and it was a very different look at Superman, so while I hated some things I was pleasantly surprised to find some of the changes were actually for the better. Most of the time on earth was reduced to smashing action scenes with little pause for emotion or human moments, with the scenes on Krypton feeling the most personal. While the flying creatures were a bit much, I liked the strange silver robots who projected images. Jimmy was absent without a mention which saddened me, but Perry White was awesome, actually getting to do more than barking at Lois and Clark from behind his desk. I loved how determined he was to save Jenny, and he gave the character depth I've not usually seen. Zod was all right. While he lacked the subtle creepiness and emotional depths of Callum Blue's take on the role, he was evil enough to make Zod seem formidable. Lana was reduced to little more than a cameo, which I didn't mind, and Pete strangely enough started out as a bully, but the biggest surprise was Jor-El who I usually hate, yet in this film I not only grew to care about him but actually rooted for him and was heartbroken when his consciousness died without knowing if Superman was able to stop Zod. My main problem was, strangely enough, with Lois. With all the hype about her character saving his emotionally, I was expecting a strong, 3-d character and a carefully crafted relationship between Clark and Lois. And while the concept of her knowing Clark was Superman right from the start improved things greatly - and I like the film taking Smallville's route of the two knowing each other well before Clark started at the Daily Planet, everything else was very disappointing. Unlike Erica Durance's strong woman with hidden depths, or Kate Bosworth's quiet yet delightfully realistic heroine, Amy Adams's character was flat, reduced to little more than a damsel in distress who gets saved multiple times and does nothing of worth in the film beside force Superman to rescue her. Their relationship felt forced and awkward, and the only scene in which they felt like the Lois and Clark I've always shipped was when Lois comes over and holds him after Zod's death. Henry Cavill was so-so as Clark/Superman. He definitely looked the part and was unquestionably handsome, but his performance felt largely wooden. Only twice, when Jonathan died and during Zod's death did he exhibit any realistic emotion, and the first scene was so out of character, Clark would never stand by and watch Jonathan die no matter what he wanted, that I felt uncomfortable more than sad. Unlike most people I didn't truly have a problem with the writers having Superman commit murder, though, because it felt like a complete expression of how much he cares about the people of earth, and he killed Zod with such sadness that it was one of the few moments he truly felt like Superman. I did love the scenes of Clark as a child playing with a cape, though, and the beginning parts of him drifting from place to place was an interesting and fresh perspective on the character. I watched Spiderman, a refreshingly old-fashioned and incredibly fun take on the superhero. Tobey Maquire did a lovely job as Peter, but my heart went out to James Franco's tragic and flawed Harry Osborn who reminds me so much of Lex in Smallville. I ached for him, and absolutely despised his father in the film; I've rarely been more happy to see a character meet their end. The CGI felt nicely restrained, the theme and photography was soaring, and I grew to love the characters as I never have before. I followed that with Spiderman 2 which was every bit as good as the first one, even if Mary Jane grated on my nerves. My favorite scene was when Peter stopped the train using his webs, and then passes out from exhaustion. It was beautiful and moving to watch the people catch and carry him inside, and promise not to reveal his secret. Then Spiderman 3 which broke my heart to see Harry turn into the goblin. Harry is so very sweet when he's not consumed with hatred for Spiderman, and completely adorable like in the scene where he dances the twist with Mary Jane. It bugs me that Peter never fully explains Harry's father's death which might have mended things before it was too late. Still his grief and determination to save Harry when his heart stops is beautifully done. Harry and Peter were incredible together in the last battle, and I couldn't help sobbing oat Harry's death..so poignant and haunting. Both the actors are superb - and goodness, can James Franco ever cry - and the scene was heartbreaking. Despite that, I loved the ending, very fitting and lovely for the trilogy. After that I gave a try to The Amazing Spiderman, and while Andrew Garfield's Peter is a rougher version than Tobey Maguire's sweet and endearing take on the role and he has no concept of humility, he still managed to grow on me enough to want to see the next film. My favorite scene was when he saved the little boy, and I loved his relationship with Gwen, too, far better than Peter and Mary Jane. On my superhero list I watched Thor, a fantastic film that was equal parts superhero movie and a refresher course in Norse mythology. I loved Thor's journey from headstrong and spoiled egotist to warmth, kindness, and greatness, contrasted with the tragedy of Loki who I pitied and still loathed by turns, as well as being fascinated by his origins. I adored Thor's relationship with Jane most of all, and can't wait for the sequel. In the meantime I watched The Avengers with it's delightfully new to me set of superheroes, and Thor, who I've grown to love, to introduce me to them all. I adored Clint who has a little bit of Oliver Queen about him, and his hinted-at romance with Natasha, and not knowing the character, I was grateful he didn't get killed off after Loki took him over. Steven/Captain America was wonderful, and Iron Man/Tony was hilarious and easy to love. I also really liked the film's Bruce Banner, a kind and soft-spoken person, even if I couldn't warm to the CGI Hulk..I'm too used to the The Incredible Hulk's gentler, more human Hulk, but I did giggle at his scene where he whacks Loki around. I loved how old-fashioned pieces of the film were, just like old superhero films, and the amazing closing credits. I loved when Tony saved the island by flying the bomb, and how Hulk saved him. The team was fantastic together, much like the Justice League, and I hope there's at least one sequel in the works eventually. Then I had to watch Captain America: The First Avenger, and I loved Steve and how courageous he was, both before and after his transformation, like the scene where he falls on the grenade, thinking it's live, to save everyone, and later when he takes off after his friend and saves all the prisoners in the factory. His costume is one of favorite superhero get-ups, and I love how he uses absolutely everything as a shield. Chris Evans is also classically handsome and very old-fashioned looking which, aided by fabulous makeup, clothing, and period detail, helps make things realistic to the time period, despite the sci-fi elements. Then I watched Iron Man and Iron Man 2 and I love Tony..he makes the entire show as I don't find the superhero side of him nearly as fascinating and fun as the human part. I ship Pepper and he so much..they're wonderful together and so sweet, and I adore his holograms and talking computer. Next was X-Men and the excellent sequel X2, my favorites out of the bunch so far, with an intriguing, multi-layered world and characters, especially the mysterious but good-hearted Wolverine. I loved his friendship with Rogue and how he was willing to sacrifice himself for her. The scene where he heals her was powerful and very poignant, and I can't help shipping them just a little. It also made me strangely happy that Hugh Jackman looks like a young Clint Eastwood, and even sounds like him a little! I also loved Scott and his unusual ability, even if he's forced to live behind odd sunglasses most of the film, and Xavier, one of the kindest and genuinely good characters I've seen in a long time. Nightcrawler is also a wonderful caring character, very much unexpectedly so. I love how the films are more about the interpersonal struggles and emotions than just special effects, a unique spin on the genre, with some heavy, powerful moments like the raid on the school and everyone trying to save the children, as well as the people's attitude toward the "mutants". Last was X-Men: The Last Stand, and while I hated and cried over how Scott and Xavier, both characters I loved, were written out, I loved the way it tied everything up. Bobby, someone I'd thought wouldn't make it through the first film alive, thankfully survived and got his happy ending with Rogue. I loved that I got to see more of Kitty, and her friendship with Bobby was adorable. I sobbed for Wolverine, having to kill Jean to save everyone, but I loved how the school carried on and continued, and people seemed more accepting of the mutants. Next was Fantastic Four and the sequel Rise Of The Silver Surfer. I wasn't familiar with the comics but I grew to love the characters, especially the good-hearted Reed and the hilariously endearing Johnny. I loved the unique development of their powers, as well as how they all worked together to defeat Doom. Ben's story arc was especially poignant and I was glad he found some happiness by the end of the first film. I loved how Johnny proved himself a hero in the second film, and I was fascinated by the mysterious Silver Surfer. After that was the fantastic and incredibly underrated Green Lantern. The special effects were dazzling, and I loved the concept of it all, along with the richly imagined aliens. Hal was a loveable, cocky protagonist, and I adored how his humanity made him the best of the lanterns as well as how he destroyed Parallax, and how the others finally came to his rescue. Next was Batman Begins which I surprisingly enjoyed a lot considering I've never cared for Batman. As I expected, Christian Bale was fantastic in the role, and it was a treat to see him playing a superhero. Bruce's relationship with Alfred was beautiful, and I loved the contrasts and comparisons between Bruce and Batman. After that was The Wolverine which, while the weakest X-Men film so far, was still a lot of fun, with Hugh Jackman effortlessly assuming the role of the tortured loner. While I disliked the focus on Jean, I loved seeing Wolverine coming back to life emotionally, paralleled by his death and coming back to life after removing the robot parasite from his heart. His relationship with Yukio was sweet, reminding me of Rogue and he, and I adored seeing Charles Xavier at the end. Next was the original Superman '70s film, and I loved Christopher Reeve nearly as much as Brandon Routh as the character. The concept of turning back time was fascinating, too.

I found another animated film, Rise Of The Guardians, a beautiful and touching fairytale with many whimsical touches. Jack, Bunnymund, North, Tooth, and Sandy were loveable protagonists, as was little Jamie, and the walking eggs and little elves were hilarious. It was equally heartwarming and poignant and I kept smiling and tearing up through the whole film. After that was the fun Megamind. I loved Megamind, such a perfect mix of over-the-top bad guy and superhero, and Metro Man, despite his short role, was hilarious. I also loved Minion and the delightfully happy ending with Megamind and Roxie. Next was the amusing The Incredibles, which, while far from a perfect film, was fun and featured a very cute family of superheroes. I loved each of their powers and how they all fought together. Then I saw Wreck-It Ralph which was quite clever and cute. I loved the candy world of Sugar Rush and the adorable characters, as well as the retro feel of the games. Next was Sinbad: Legend Of The Seven Seas, a gorgeously animated, swashbuckling adventure. I loved Sinbad, his colorful crew including a cute dog, and their mythology-tinged quest. After that was Epic, an imaginative and cute fantasy. I loved the world and concepts of the story, and Nod was adorable. I do wish MK had stayed small, though, as she and Nod were sweet together, but I was happy Ronin survived and he and Nod patched things up. Then I saw the Toy Story trilogy. While not my favorite animated films by any means, and surprisingly dark for kid's films, there were still quite a few cute moments. I loved the clever way the toys were each portrayed, like the etch-a-sketch, Barbie and Ken, or Woody's floppy legs, Woody's devotion to the other toys, and Woody and Buzz's friendship. Buzz's Spanish setting was absolutely hilarious, definitely the best part of the films, and I teared up at the bittersweet ending. After that was the adorable Gnomeo and Juliet. I enjoyed the clever, light-hearted, and even poignant take on the story, and the characters, especially Gnomeo, Shroom, and Featherstone were precious and loveable. Next was Home whose adorable cat and alien won me over, as did the sweet storyline.

I watched the latest version of Les Miserables. Although I was correct in my assumption that the story would feel strange as a musical, and I found the constant singing of lines better spoken to be annoying after a while, there were some very good things about it, too. Some of the music, especially "I Dreamed A Dream" and the barricade boys's songs, were beautiful, and the filming was stunning, showing the poverty yet beauty of old France. Hugh Jackman was brilliant as Jean ValJean, definitely the most layered and realistic portrayal I've seen in all the versions I've watched, and the ending, with him joining those lost, had me in tears. He also, surprisingly, had quite a lovely, expressive voice. While no Marius can ever steal my heart the way Hans Matheson did in the 1998 version, Eddie Redmayne, despite not looking anything like I picture Marius, did a good job with the role, especially with the heartbreaking "Empty Chairs At Empty Tables". His getting injured at the barricade and the sewer rescue were uniquely done, and I was impressed by how realistic and filthy everything looked, as well as the foreshadowed imagery of the coffins as part of the barricade. I loved the kinder, more fatherly image of Jean and Marius, especially the gorgeous "Bring Him Home", but I missed Marius's closeness to Gavroche as the two had little to no interaction unlike most versions. Little Cosette was precious and perfect with Jean, but sadly grown up Cosette's role was reduced to little more than a sweet voice and a few longing looks at Marius. As much as I loved actually seeing their wedding in a version, I was disappointed by how the film treated her character, as well as her seemingly whirlwind romance with Marius, pushing Eponine as the more sympathetic ship of the two with Marius, unpleasantly for me since I've always disliked her. Gavroche was perfect, a cocky mix of adorable imp and little spitfire rebel, and his death, as usual, was one of the toughest scenes to watch, as was the poignant death of the last two barricade boys. Javert, for the first time, had a sympathetic side, and I even felt for him when he pinned the medal on Gavroche's body.

In other new films I saw the hilarious Disney George Of The Jungle, a delightfully tongue-in-cheek comedy that kept me laughing through the whole thing. George was sweet, innocent, and incredibly funny, and I loved his relationship with Ursula. Ape was also amusing, and Shep was precious. It was one of the happiest, most feel good films I've seen in a long time, and the happy ending with little curly-haired baby George made me grin ear to ear. Next was Newsies, a fun and wonderful musical. The period details were impressive and I adored the characters, especially Jack and little Les and the friendship between the boys. After that was Inkheart, a beautiful, highly imaginative fantasy where book characters come to life. I loved Farid - and ship him with Meggie - and the family relationships between Mo, Meggie, and Resa. My favorite character, though, was the fabulous Dustfinger. My heart bled for him at the same time I rooted for him to get home and adored his fire skills. He was quite a complex, fascinating character, too, and I was so glad he got his happy ending. Then I saw Empire Of The Sun, an unusual and deeply poignant war film through the eyes of an English child in Japan during WWII. Christian Bale was amazing as little Jim, going through every emotion and growing so much throughout the film, and his performance had me alternating between smiles and tears. The last parts were especially haunting and the entire film was beautifully done. After that was Pacific Rim, a fascinating concept including my favorite sci-fi trope of mind-melding that didn't quite measure up but with some flashes of brilliance here and there, especially when the focus was less on smashing things and more on the human interest side. I loved Raleigh - I've missed Charlie Hunnam's pretty face - and the film was at it's best when focused on him, showing him from an idealistic young pilot whose brother is killed to a seemingly decades older man called back into action in a last ditch effort to save the world. I liked his relationship with Mako and would love the sequel to explore more of them. I loved Herc, too, and his relationship with Chuck and Chuck's ultimate sacrifice had me in tears, especially when he said goodbye to his dog. Newton and Hermann were amusing in their few scenes, and I was sad about the Russian duo and the triplets who had far too little screentime. I never could warm up to Stacker, though, and disliked him for how he treated Raleigh so I wasn't as affected by his death. The recurring theme of the clock up until the last part where it's finally stopped was poignant. Next was The Mortal Instruments which, despite my watching it entirely for Jamie Campbell Bower, I ended up enjoying. The premise was fun, especially the fascinating idea of runes, and I loved most of the side characters, especially the werewolves. Jace was my favorite, though, showing a lot of character growth and depth across the film. After that was the sweet Sooner Or Later, a film I've wanted to see for ages. Rex Smith was lovely as usual, playing a sensitive singer, and on a shallow note his hair was gorgeous. The story was touching and quite funny in parts, the music was perfect, and I loved the hopeful ending. Next was The Trial, an intriguing legal thriller and excellent adaptation of the book which I enjoyed. Next was A Child Is Waiting, a poignant and deeply moving study of a little filmed subject. It made me cry but I loved it, and thought it was Judy Garland's best film. Next was the heartwrenching '40s version of i>Waterloo Bridge, a beautiful and haunting tragedy. Next was a childhood obsession and my favorite Shirley Temple movie Bright Eyes which I still love just as much.

I'm finished with season five of Wagon Train, now, and the feel was slightly different, with more of the stories taking place in towns instead of on the journey. The cast is still the same, but it's Flint's last season and I'm already missing him, even though I love Coop. Excellent episodes include the fascinating "Kitty Allbright Story", the utterly heartbreaking "Charlie Shutup Story", and the adorable makeshift family saga of "The Clementine Jones Story". The season's best, though, is the wonderful "Dick Pederson Story" which casts James MacArthur as a sweet loner who befriends a fatherless family of little girls and nurses them through an epidemic. Best of all the episode features an adorable ending. Onto season six now and mourning Flint's unexplained absence - a word or two saying where he was would have been nice - but otherwise enjoying it. There's a touch of comedy in the fun "Charlie Wooster Outlaw" to balance out the tragedy of the poignant "Lily Legend Story" which explores Duke's past. Other excellent episodes include "Davy Baxter Story" in which Chris is forced to make an agonizing decision to amputate a young man's arm to save his life, a story in which Tommy Sands gets to shine as the title character, and "Caroline Casteel Story" about a woman rescued from the Indians who returns home to find no one accepts her.

I watched the fascinating and haunting documentary Our Spirits Don't Speak English about the Indian boarding schools and was both deeply moved and horrified at all I learned about a very bleak time in America's history. The personal testimonies were especially poignant.
 
 
feeling: silly
calliope tune: "An Old-Fashioned Love Song"-Three Dog Night
 
 
Kathleen
I went to see Oz the Great and Powerful and it was amazing, the perfect Oz film I've always hoped for. James Franco was absolutely wonderful at the role and I fangirled so much over the 1904 carnival opening, both in awe over the sight of it as well as having it in black and white. The themesong was gorgeous and the opening and closing credits were lovely and old-fashioned. Oz was incredible, with just the right balance of CGI and real things, and I adored the music of the various plants and animals as Oscar sailed down the river as well as the butterfly trees, yellow brick road, and Emerald City. I wish the film had shown something of China Town before it was destroyed since it looked like such a sweet, fairytale place, but China Girl was the cutest thing ever! I loved her father-daughter-like relationship with Oscar and how gentle he was with her, and Finley was hilarious. I suppose I should have picked up on the clues but I was completely surprised when Theodora turned into the Wicked Witch. It seemed incredibly tragic, and I've never thought of the Witch that way before. The battle against the witches was amazing, with steampunk and carnival tricks, and I couldn't stop grinning ear to ear at the ending. I also saw Return To Oz and was pleasantly surprised to find it more sweet than scary, and very much capturing the feel of the books. Dorothy, a child as she should be, has an adorable innocence while still having a lot of spunk, and is quite the good little actress for a first role, and her wonderfully fairytale-like companions, especially the cute Jack Pumpkinhead, my favorite in the books, are fantastic and fit perfectly with Dorothy. Ozma is sweet and lovely, exactly as I imagined, and the special effect of her stepping through the mirror was my favorite among the rest, all very well done. While the Emerald City lies in ruins for much of the film, there's still plenty of magic and wonder in Oz, and I loved the creative and whimsical lunchpail tree as well as the glowing effect of the ruby slippers. Then I watched all of the silent Oz films and His Majesty The Scarecrow of Oz, actually written and directed by L. Frank Baum, was my favorite. Tiny and adorable Violet MacMillan was the perfect Dorothy and despite the film pairing up Pon with the Princess who does nothing except be bewitched and have characters fall in love with her, Dorothy and Pon were too cute together, making me want to rewrite the ending and have Pon/Dorothy be canon. Refreshingly, the Wizard wasn't just a "man behind the curtain" and truly had magic, helping the characters, restoring Pon from his enchantment, and making "preserved witch". There was also a quirky and adorable scene which I loved that had a mermaid swimming with an parasol in her hand.

Despite being the last person on earth to do so, I've finally seen Harry Potter, starting with the first Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. I instantly fell in love with the world and the characters and the richness of imagination of it all, especially the living paintings and talking telegrams. Everyone and everything is fairytale-like and perfectly fantasy-like, and all fabulous. Then Harry Potter and the Chamber Of Secrets, which while not quite as good as the first, was still fun and clever, even with a somewhat darker feel. I love the friendship between Harry, Ron, and Hermione and it was even more evident in the second film. Then Harry Potter and the Prisoner Of Azkaban and I adored Sirius, definitely my favorite minor character so far, such a wonderful and unusual character, and kind, too. My favorite part was the time travel, always fun and even more so here, and the happy ending for everyone. Next was Harry Potter and the Goblet Of Fire, probably my favorite plot so far, and I loved the concept of the contests, especially the one in the water. Cedric's death was shocking and horrible, and I was actually surprised by how much I loved his character considering I'm not a fan of the actor. Daniel Radcliffe, as well as the others, keeps getting better and better at his role, and even the tiny parts are brilliantly cast. I especially am learning to adore Fred and George, and David Tennant was deliciously wicked as Barty Crouch Jr. Next was Harry Potter and the Order Of The Phoenix, and while loving the character development, I was saddened by the gloomy tone. I hated the new professor, but loved the students forming their own school with Harry as the teacher. Severus Snape became more interesting to me with the glimpses into his past, as well as a surprising look at Harry's father when he was young. I adored the new character, Luna, a lovely mix of sadness and sweetness, as well as her touching friendship with Harry. I sobbed over Sirius's death which felt completely unnecessary and horribly tragic, but cheered when Harry was able to overcome Voldemort's possession. Still there was a lot of fun such as Christmas with the Weasleys, and Fred and George - growing more beloved to me by the film - gleefully destroying the school exams with fireworks and flying broomsticks. Next was Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and the children are growing up so much, falling in love and everything! While I would have preferred Harry/Hermione or even Harry/Luna, Harry and Ginny are quite cute together, and Hermione and Ron seem sweet enough for now. The Weasleys are as wonderful as ever - I especially love Fred and George's shop - and I was sad when their lovely little house got destroyed. Ron scared to me death in the scene where he nearly gets killed, which made me realize how much I love his character. I was saddened by Dumbledore's death, as much as I half expected it, but I found the concept of the horcruxes fascinating. Then was Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part 1 and I loved Bill and Fleur, so sweet and wonderful together. Harry's owl getting killed was too sad, as was George's ear, but I loved the way everyone rallied around to defeat Voldemort and protect Harry from him. I sobbed over poor Dobby, such a wonderful and brave little elf and one of favorite side characters, and it felt like one loss too many. On the fun side of things I loved Hermione's bottomless bag, and Ron/Hermione is growing more on me..they're actually quite adorable together. Last was Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part 2, an incredible and powerful finale. The destroying of his horcrux was powerful, showing the emotional effect upon not only Voldemort but Harry as well, and I loved the bits of mercy and closure such as Harry saving Draco from the fire after all he'd done. Snape's death was haunting and deeply sad, even if I could never quite grasp whose side he was on until the end, and I teared up over Lupin and Tonks lying dead side by side with their hands almost touching. Fred's death was the worst, though, since I adored the twins, and I couldn't stop sobbing with Ron when the scene showed him lying there. The flashback of Snape and Lily as children was poignant and deeply sad, but lovely in a bittersweet way, and finally made me understand Snape as well as providing insight into Harry's mother. Snape emerged as a deeply tragic hero, surprising me by how much I grew to love his character in those few short minutes. Harry being the last horcrux was stunning and haunting, as well as neatly tying everything together, and I could feel the weight on him having to go to his death. The epilogue was beautiful, though, very much what I'd hoped for and happily adorable. I loved their children and was impressed by how much older they made everyone look, very believable. All in all I adored the series and am very sad to be finished with it, even if I have rewatches to look forward to. The world was magical, the characters dearly beloved, and the cast were all amazing. Daniel Radcliffe impressed me the most - I was familiar with him and impressed by his performance in the incredible The Woman In Black but otherwise didn't know him - growing from adorable and innocent little boy to amazing young man.

I love and consider M. Night Shyamalan a genius with story and direction and I always adore his films, especially the ones I watched recently. The first was Lady In The Water, a lovely, unusual, and visually gorgeous fairytale with easy to love characters. I loved the mermaid-like air about Story as well as the world within the Cove with all the people's lives. The film was also refreshingly slow-moving and I adored how all the people banded together to help Story return home. I followed that with another one of his films, the unusual and creative Unbreakable. I loved the contrasts between Elijah and David, as well as the fascinating illusions to superheroes and comic books in plot and style. The twists in the plot were quite incredible, too, and the stunning final revelation took my breath away. Next was his chilling but amazing The Sixth Sense. Haley Joel Osment was stunning as the troubled yet deeply insightful little Cole, and my heart bled for him and all he could see and hear when no one else could. The final twist was jaw-dropping and deeply poignant. Last was the spooky but beautiful Signs which gave me everything I love in a sci-fi: aliens, family togetherness, stunning acting, and an amazing string of coincidences that added up in the finale.

I discovered the lovely pairing of Bobby Darin and Sandra Dee who were perfect together with That Funny Feeling, an adorable and gently humorously silly romance. I loved the zaniness of the premise, as well as the happy ending. Then I had to see another film of their's, which turned out to be the cute and in many ways even more adorable If A Man Answers. They were fabulous together, and even played husband and wife instead of love interests, and the plot was just as zany and loveable as the first film.

In other new films I watched the 1980s gorgeous fantasy Starman, mostly because of my love for the spin-off tv series, and was impressed by the beauty of it, such a lovely, moving fairytale. Jeff Bridges was wonderfully sweet and innocent as the alien, and I loved his slow-growing and perfect romance with Jenny. Their moments were the best even as much as I loved the story, and I adored when he showed her the star that was his world and told her what their son will be like, definitely my favorite scene. The theme was lovely, too, very fitting. Then I saw the adorable The Water Horse, an incredibly cute and poignant fantasy. Crusoe was precious, and Angus was a wonderful character, as were all the others, especially Mobley, each richly detailed and easy to love or dislike. I had tears in my eyes by the ending but I loved it dearly. Next was Far and Away, a surprisingly lovely historical romance. Despite the slow-moving opening and originally somewhat unlikeable characters, I quickly fell in love with Shannon and Joseph and their story as they struggled in America and grew to care about each other. The scene where they pretend to be a married couple in a beautiful abandoned house was touching and the turning point in their building relationship. I loved the fascinating ending, like Joseph looking down on himself and then coming back through Shannon's love, and the beautiful way they claimed their land together. Following that I saw Beastly, the updated and changed version of Beauty and the Beast that still manages to capture the beauty and magic of the fairytale. Alex Pettyfer was superb as egotistical Kyle who is transformed by a witch into a scarred and disfigured man with one year to find someone to love him. I loved his slow internal transformation as well as his sweet romance with Lindy. The mixture of modern and faithfulness to the tale such as the roses and Kyle's fascinating and ever-changing tattoo was beautifully done, and as a big fan of the book I was thrilled with it's adaptation. Next was A Knight's Tale, an entertaining and curious mix of the Middle Ages and modern day that managed to fulfill my void of jousting, one of my favorite "knightly" things and so often overlooked or underappreciated in films. William was easy to love and root for, Chauncer was hilarious, and I loved all the other characters, too. Then was the beautiful Soul Surfer which I found deeply moving and inspiring. AnnaSophia Robb, always excellent, was superb as Bethany, and knowing it was a true story made it all the more powerful. Next was the '90s version of The Borrowers which, while not faithful to the books, was quite cute and fun. I loved the addition of a little brother, Peagreen, to the Clock family, and Spinner and Arrietty's friendship - I even found myself shipping them when they grow up - as well as the magical glimpses into the world of the borrowers. After that was the fun Van Helsing. I adored Hugh Jackman as the title character - and he looked very swoon-worthy with that long hair - and his high-speed adventures battling monsters. The finale, with Anna dying to save him and Frankenstein's Monster sailing out to sea, was poignant, and I wish there'd be more about Van Helsing's past as I was hoping for some flashbacks, but I enjoyed it, especially the steampunk feel and the amusing Carl. Next was the unusual The Others. The concept was fascinating right from the beginning, with the light sensitive children and moody, foggy English manor house, and I loved the inclusion of mourning photography as part of the themes, a rare thing I've always had something of an interest in. The ending twists were shocking but fascinating, and despite a few chills up my spine I liked the conclusion. After that was the gorgeous and heartwrenching Doctor Zhivago, 2002 remake, which I loved, surprisingly so since I've always disliked the original. Hans Matheson was stunning and shattered my heart as Yuri, the idealistic poet-doctor, and his poignant romances with both Tonya and Lara were heartbreaking. I loved the scenes with Yuri and the children, though, which were adorable, and I sobbed at the ending with little Yuri running, even with the voice-over telling me their child at least survived. The history, especially the newsreel footage, was fascinating, too, and I learned a lot from this beautiful, deeply moving film. I followed that with another Hans Matheson film, the somewhat fictional but stunningly beautiful Imperium: Nero with him as the title character, a sensitive, slowly twisting young man driven to madness. His relationships were poignant and tragic, and the ending made me tear up a little, mostly due to his powerful acting in managing to make Nero pitiable.

In new animated films I found How To Train Your Dragon and promptly fell in love with it. Hiccup was quirky and perfect, Toothless was adorable, and I loved the imagination of the story, as well as the setting. Next was the Arthurian adventure Quest For Camelot which, while far from perfect, was entertaining. I loved Garrett, a uniquely blind knight, and the hilarious chicken, and the ending was lovely. After that was the precious, heartwarming, and utterly adorable Arthur Christmas. I loved James McAvoy's voice work as the sweet and clumsy Arthur, and I laughed through all of the hilarious moments as everyone scrambled to deliver Gwen's gift. I loved how clever and imaginative everything was, as well as the touching, beautiful finale. Then was the humorous spoof of horror films Hotel Transylvania, and I loved Johnny and Mavis, their relationship, the amusing other characters, and the perfect ending. Next I saw The Prince Of Egypt, a stunningly animated film with gorgeous music, especially the beautiful "When You Believe", and a lovely, unusual take on the story with the focus on the tragedy of Moses and Ramses's journey from brothers to enemies, and an incredible nightmare scene in which hieroglyphics came to life.

I'm watching the eighth season of The Virginian and there's few changes this season with the exception of seven's David vanishing, and a new ranch hand, Jim Horn, played by an impossibly young and always completely wonderful Tim Matheson who brings some much-needed prettiness to the cast. He gets to shine in "Family Man", and he's incredibly sweet, especially with the baby. He even gets to sing later in the season! "A Flash Of Darkness" is an unusual episode, despite using the tired trope of blinding a character, if for nothing else than the Virginian finally expressing emotion, even fear, when he calls for Trampas after his injury, and suffers nightmares, cowering in terror from shots. I jolted and got a lump in my throat when he grabbed and hugged Trampas with a quiver in his voice, so unlike him and yet highlighting the friendship between the two that's so often hinted at and spoken of and rarely overtly seen. The season's best is the beautifully poignant "A Woman Of Stone" which takes the usual "white woman returns from Indians" plotline, and makes it believable, acknowledging the span of time and how the characters have changed while still presenting a hopeful, although not idyllic ending.

I'm on season six of Rawhide now, and after seasons of changing and worsening shows it's like finding an old friend back. Except for Clay's disappearance - no great loss - nothing has changed, giving the season a comfortable yet still fresh feel as the good stories keep coming. I like the new theme's look with the silhouettes, giving the show an even older feel. Excellent episodes include the spooky twist ending of "Incident Of The Prophecy", the haunting and poignant episode "Incident At Two Graves", the tragic and unusual "Incident Of The Peyote Cup", and the delightfully light-hearted "Incident Of The Pied Piper" which gives Wishbone a chance to shine as well as providing some adorable moments.

I've discovered the delightful Pushing Daisies, an utterly hilarious and completely adorable show. Ned is cute and precious, and I love his relationship with Chuck, and Emerson and his knitting never fails to make me giggle. Everything is so bright and colorful it looks like something out of the 1970s, and the sets, especially the Pie Hole, are lovely. Plus the narrator is just perfect. In the second season Ned's magician twin half-brothers get introduced and they're wonderful. I've been working through the whole series and have fallen entirely in love with it and it's characters.

I learned of and watched The Lone Gunmen this week, the fabulous spin-off series from The X-Files. Byers, Frohike, and Langly are wonderful as usual, and they're joined by a fourth member, the overly-eager and somewhat dorky but loveable Jimmy Bond. He quickly shot to my favorite as the heart of the group, even as much as I adore the trio. Yves, the other new character, is fascinating, a mix of friend and foe. My favorite episode was the powerful and unusually poignant "Maximum Byers" in which Byers and Jimmy go undercover at a prison to free an innocent man. The surprise twists and bittersweet ending made it just perfect. Other great episode include "Three Men and a Smoking Diaper" is a fun episode that let's the guys show their softer sides while taking care of an infant. Langly especially was adorable with the baby. Also "The Cap'n Tobey Show" which is equal parts who done it and humor with Langly the focal point. I loved the plot, the hilarious ending, and Jimmy and Yves's relationship in it.

In new shows I've discovered the fantastic Primeval and am loving the imagination and glorious fun of it all, as well as it's wonderfully geeky characters and adorable Rex. Cutter and Connor are my favorites, but I have a soft spot for Abby (all these characters and their dimples!) since I ship Connor and her. The whole team works beautifully together, though, and I'm loving the flavor of the series. I finished up season two now and am slowly learning to enjoy the new format, with the help of fun episodes that include raptors in a shopping mall. Claudia has turned into Jenny which is something of a slight improvement, but the annoying Leek and Caroline aren't welcome additions by any means. Still the team is wonderful and Connor and Abby get a beautiful and extremely shippy set of scenes in the episode with the merpeople. Stephen's death was completely horrible and heartbreaking, though, and I wish the writers had killed Helen off instead, since I can't stand her and I liked Stephen. Then season three, off to a great start with a spooky old house and decade old mystery, and Connor imitating Cutter's Scottish accent is the most adorable thing ever. New character Becker doesn't fill Stephen's shoes by any means but he's different and he grows on me more with each episode. But Cutter's death..I'm never getting over that. Stephen's hurt horribly. Cutter's completely shattered me. He was my tied second favorite with Connor and I loved him so much. I can't seem to warm to Danny, either, he's got a cold edge Cutter never had and for all his heroics something just rubs me the wrong way. Sarah, so far, is a lot of fun, though, and I'm grateful to see her replace Jenny. But Abby kissing Connor and their beautiful moment there more than makes up for everything else, and best of all Helen finally gets what she deserved - I've never been so grateful to see a character killed off! Onto season four then, with many format changes. New character Matt is the first intriguing leader since Cutter's death, and Jess is sweet enough, even if she'll never replace Sarah. Still Becker is there and Connor and Abby are back and shippier than ever. Season five was fantastic with an amazing storyline that kept me excited as well as sad that it was the last season. I grew to love Matt, especially when he returned to 1860s London in a steampunk explanation for Spring Heeled Jack, and he made a wonderful leader. Emily made for an interesting character, and I loved her romance with Matt and it having a happy ending against all odds. I grew to adore Lester, always a character I disliked, and he was awesome in the finale, finally leaving his office and standing up to the creatures. He almost never shows it but he loves his team, and I kept grinning ear to ear when he came back to work in the end. Despite the attempt to redeem him at the end, I just couldn't make myself feel anything for Phillip after the way he used and abandoned Connor. Connor broke my heart all season long with his naivety and doubting Abby, but he turned out to be the real hero at last. I loved watching his character grow across the seasons and see Cutter's faith in him rewarded, even if Connor always doubted it himself. His relationship with Abby became so beautiful. I loved how she pulled him back emotionally when he was ready to give up in the finale, and the fabulous proposal scene. Abby was wonderful all season, but especially so in the finale, saving Connor over and over. The ending was perfect except for the hanging thread of a storyline that never got resolved, but I felt happy with it overall, since otherwise it was a fitting last story for everyone.

I discovered and watched the odd and short-lived series Harsh Realm this week. It's an underrated little gem from the creator of The X-Files with a richly detailed, darkly dystopian virtual world that threatens to destroy the real world due to the plans of an evil dictator. The protagonist is Tom, a soldier forced into and trapped inside the world who has to stay alive and take out the corrupt leader to save everyone. I love his little team, and the unusual characters, some good, some bad, who surround him, and the episodes are often intriguing and always fun. "Reunion" is a fascinating and touching story with the focus on Tom and Pinocchio's friendship as well as Tom's with his mother. The scene with Sophie and Tom seeing each other through her eyes was amazing. The series' best is the stunning "Manus Domini", a breathtaking and haunting portrayal of faith and loss which made Pinocchio my favorite character. The ending is deeply moving and tragic, and Tom's voiceovers are especially poignant. While waiting for season nine of The X-Files I watched I Want To Believe. While I didn't enjoy it as much as the first film I still liked the secondary storyline, much better, in fact, than the main one which was a little too gruesome and disturbing for my taste. Scully's attempts to save little Christian were a poignant parallel with William. Mulder seemed a little off at first but fell back into character fairly quickly, and I adored that Scully finally said she loved him and that they kissed. His final line was beautiful and made me grin ear to ear. Also I liked the little bit of Mulder and Skinner friendship included, even if Skinner had a strangely small part.

Feeling nostalgic I watched an episode of Boy Meets World, the wonderful "Can I Help to Cheer You" which was a perfect mix of zany and hilarious humor and poignant sadness. I loved the storyline with Eric, since he was always my favorite - I loved his sweetness and quite amazing hair - and he was adorable with little Tommy. I wish he'd adopted him, but I loved that the two remained friends at the end, such a cute and perfect episode. In new tv series I discovered the Ray Bradbury Theater, adaptations of his stories that I've always loved. My favorite so far is the hauntingly beautiful "The Lake" about a man drawn back to the summer place where a tragedy happened when he was ten. The conclusion was poignant, and the episode was perfectly underplayed and acted, giving it a dream-like quality. I also found the '90s series Roswell this week, a fun story of aliens who survived the 1949 crash and pass themselves off as humans, undiscovered until one of them, teenager Max, heals the human girl, Liz, he has a crush on, when she's shot in the restaurant where she works. Max is a sweet character, with just a dash of mystery to make him seem alien, and I was shipping Max/Liz before the end of the pilot. Then, feeling nostalgic, I started watching season one of Highlander and found it as awesome as I remembered. It's quite a fascinating and often poignant series, and I love Duncan MacLeod and the glimpses that are given of his mostly tragic past.

I borrowed one of the early film "Treasures" from the library, too, and there was an amazing documentary on San Pietro, filmed during WWII with all the battle explained clearly. I've been fascinated by that battle since my obsession with The Gallant Men began, and now I finally understand it. I loved seeing so much of the once beautiful village, too, and the children who could still smile and laugh despite all they'd suffered.
 
 
calliope tune: "Here Comes The Star"-Herman's Hermits
feeling: nostalgic