Kathleen
27 January 2016 @ 03:10 am
The X-Files, my childhood love, is back for a tenth season after all these years, and I'm happily wallowing in nostalgia. It's a complete delight so far, with all the old faces, easter eggs, and parallels to the past episodes, along with the original intro and theme. "My Struggle" is an interesting, although flawed start. The actors take a bit to get into their roles again - Scully by the end of the first episode, Mulder by the second - although Skinner is as if he never left. I also loved the glimpse of the Cigarette Smoking Man at the end. It made me sad to see Mulder so skeptical and jaded, even though it makes sense after all these years, and I actually winced when he tore the I want to believe poster. But the scene where his face light up when he sees the spaceship was so Mulder I teared up. "Founder's Mutation" is a superb blend of the myth arc and monster of the week, with a sympathetic monster, and a heartbreaking subplot featuring Mulder and Scully's daydreams about if they'd kept William, all of which, especially the forehead kisses, had me sobbing. "Mulder and Scully Meet the Were-Monster" is pure comedy, and despite how much I hated the original 100% comedy episodes, it works, helped along by the offbeat and hilarious premise of a monster who is bitten by a human and becomes human when the moon comes out. The character was great fun - I also loved the puppy, I adored seeing Mulder slowly becoming a believer again, and the theme being his ringtone was flawless. "Home Again" is a gut-wrenching subplot against an intriguing concept. It's not carried off perfectly and the storylines don't fit perfectly together, but they both impact emotionally, especially in the flashbacks. "Babylon" seems to have been greatly disliked by most, but I rather enjoyed it. The guest characters, especially Miller, were enjoyable, the concept intriguing, and I never knew how much I needed Mulder dancing to country western music in a stetson. I was very sad how little screentime the Lone Gunmen got, though, and that they were only a hallucination. "My Struggle II", is excellent, making my wish the whole season could have been a miniseries of the plot, rather than just the first and final episodes. I've always preferred the mythology arc episodes to the stand alone, and it's fun to finally see the Syndicate's endgame after all these years. It was a delight to see Mulder and the Cigarette Smoking Man interact again. As much as I love to hate CSM, and as proud as I am of Mulder for not taking his deal, I've always found their dynamic fascinating, with that strange mix of father-son relationship against hatred and so much evil committed. It was wonderful to have Miller back - I adored his scenes with Mulder - and Einstein grew on me a lot compared to last episode, even if her skepticism is far more annoying than Scully's ever was. I've never been a big Reyes fan, but it was nice to see her again, even if she seemed desperately out of character. I just can't believe Reyes would ever ally herself with CSM, and especially not for the selfish reason of saving her own life, even if she did give Scully the information she needed to help everyone sick. I was incredibly sad that Doggett didn't even get a mention, though, as part of me had always hoped, even if I didn't ship it, that Reyes and he ended up together, since it might have made him happy. I loved the opening of alien!Scully, as well as Scully being the key to saving the world - Mulder's line about thanking the CSM for saving her and CSM commenting on her being Mulder's weakness made my shipper heart melt - but the cliffhanger ending left me screeching and desperate for more. Overall, weak spots aside, I enjoyed the season, and it was so wonderful and nostalgic to have my childhood babies back on my screen.

Once Upon A Time is back for the second half of season five with a mythology arc, and while nothing like what I'd expected I'm enjoying most of it so far. I love seeing this new version of Emma,still strong and brave, but no longer closed off and hurting, now determined to save Killian and fight for their future. I was never a big Neal fan, but I was glad she finally got closure with him. Killian, always being whumped, is already breaking my heart, even though I love seeing his faith in Emma and knowing she was coming for him. I liked seeing the origins of Liam and he entering the Navy and first seeing the Jolly Rodger. I was a little sad about Liam's deal with Hades, but did love him sticking by his brother and doing the right thing in the end, earning himself a happy afterlife and closure with Killian. Killian and Emma's goodbye broke me, but their reunion, and Killian finally coming back to life, was the most beautiful scene ever. The little kisses Emma gave him had me giggling and grinning. Emma has grown so much since she took her walls down, and I adored seeing them back together, as well as Emma finally admitting, without anything bad having to happen, that she loved him. I adored Charming hugging Killian, as well as trying to save him from Mr. Hyde. Snow White is delightful so far, finally getting to be the character I loved in season one again, and I love Charming and her moments together and with baby Neal. I adored her calling Killian by his first name and acting motherly toward him. Her friendship with Hercules was a surprise delight and I only wish we could see more of him. I liked Meg, too, who, while very different from the Disney version, was a sweet character. Hades, never one of my favorite Disney villains, is a mix of annoying and truly scary, even if the flaming hair makes me snicker. I also despised his romance with Zelena, and was delighted when she killed him. Surprisingly Zelena, once my least favorite character, has grown on me quite a bit, largely due to her love for her baby, and the fact that she's a lot nicer with her memories back. I also enjoy her new relationship with Regina. I teared up during Regina's goodbye to her father - and loved that Henry got to meet him - as well as her closure with Daniel. I liked her getting closure with her mother, but was annoyed Cora, after all the horrible things she did, got redeemed for doing so little to make amends. I'm broken over Robin Hood's death, as well as what it means to Regina, and leaving poor little Roland an orphan, but I loved that Regina didn't revert back to the Evil Queen, and even attempted to destroy her other half, showing how much she's grown. I adore that Rumplestiltskin and Belle are finally having a baby, and Rumple's instant willingness to do whatever he had to to protect the baby breaks my heart and gives me Rumple and Bae feels all over again - if seeing them in the flashback wasn't heart-tugging enough! I did like that he showed remorse at sending Milah into the river, too, even if I despise Milah and honestly didn't care that he did it. But I appreciate that Rumplestiltskin has seemingly come to terms with his darkness and found a balance between his love for Belle and his power, something I hope Belle will eventually come around to, as I want so much to see them and their baby as a family. I love Belle but she's frustrating me so far this season, pulling away from Rumplestiltskin when, in this case, he's actually doing the right thing, being honest with her and himself, and trying to save their baby. I'm also incredibly sad that True Love's Kiss didn't work to wake her, after Rumplestiltskin was willing to give up who he is to try it. The season finale introduces a new and intriguing world, the Land of Untold Stories, with a delightful cameo by the Three Musketeers, a tantalizing hint at Agrabah, and new characters in the introduction of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. I love the steampunk feel of the world and characters, and the concept of characters being able to split off their evil sides is intriguing, leaving me excited for season six.

The Musketeers has completed its third and final season, and despite a few things that felt rushed or forced, I enjoyed every moment. The series finally hit its stride and settled into its characters even more than the previous seasons, all of whom have grown so much. I adored that everyone got a happy ending, especially Aramis, D'Artagnan and Constance (I was so afraid for all of them), and Aramis and Anne's little son was absolutely adorable. I also loved Porthos getting a love interest, and a little family all at once. I wasn't incredibly fond of Sylvie at first - I greatly enjoy Athos and Milady's relationship, felt Sylive and Athos's came out of left field, and aren't very fond of Athos in general, and less so this season - but she grew on me, and seemed to make Athos a better person. I was surprisingly pleased with the villains this season, compared to my hatred - and not in a love to hate way - of the last two season's, with each one unique, and some even strangely sympathetic, like the King's ill-fated brother. I was saddened to lose both the King and Treville, but did love seeing Milady again, even if only for a couple episodes. I also adored the baby Musketeer - I never did get his name - and was so happy he survived and ended up becoming a full-fledged Musketeer in the end.

I watched The Living and the Dead, and while it wasn't at all what I was expecting, I completely fell in love with it. The acting was superb, the music, scenery, and cinematography all breathtaking, and the plot had a gorgeous Gothic feel that delighted me, as well as shocking me with the twists. I liked the themes of growth and healing, as well as realizing one's own limitations, and Nathan and Charlotte's relationship was both adorable and heartbreaking yet realistic. I loved the poignancy of the episodes, and how the writers didn't shy away from tragedy and darkness, while still leaving a glimmer of hope. I also had no idea how much I needed to see Colin Morgan holding a baby until now.

Zoo is on season two, and it's a surprisingly emotional and jarring ride from season one's fluffy outrageous tone. I'm not happy with the changes in Jamie's character - I get that she suffered a lot but becoming a murderous psycho, and lashing out at Mitch who fought the hardest to save her, seems wildly out of character. Logan was an interesting, although completely under-used and largely pointless character. who didn't seem to quite deserve the horrible ending he got. I'm broken over Chloe's senseless death (and the destruction of my otp), and Dariela irks me endlessly - I despise her instant romance with Abe, as much as I want him to get a *nice* love interest. But, on the bright side there's snarky as usual Mitch and Abraham and Jackson's heart-warming friendship to fill the void. I also adore that we're finally getting backstory on Jackson, including flashbacks to his sad childhood, and, while I'm worried and so sad for him, I'm very interesting in his story arc this season as he slowly mutates. I love the new and creative animals this season, especially the adorable Moe the jellyfish, and the electric ants.

I've started watching Roswell again, a show I faintly remember from my childhood, and falling in love with it. Max and Liz's star-crossed, alien/human love story hits all my tropes, and it's easy to also root for Michael and Maria's romance. I love Max, who projects the perfect mixture of sad vulnerability and other-worldliness, and Michael continues to break my heart. I also surprisingly even love the female characters, with Liz and Maria perfectly tolerable, and Isabel very likeable. I adore the way the characters, particularly the alien trio, form a makeshift family. While Kyle is a somewhat useless character, I did love his interactions with Max in the episode where they were both drunk, and hope for more scenes with the two of them. The Sheriff is a fascinating character, from a sympathetic villain to on their team, and I love his relationship with the kids. I love the theme and setting, especially the Crashdown, too. I'm not especially fond of Tess, as much as I like Emilie de Ravin, who feels like a plot device solely to create angst for Max and Liz, but I do love the realization of who and what the aliens are.

I binge-watched the complete series of Roar, and it was such a treat to plunge back into a Kiwi show again. They have such a lovely feel and warmth, and are so nostalgic to me. I adored the Celtic soundtrack, and the characters, for the most part, were all likeable, especially Conor. Molly annoys me a bit, but I love everyone else. I'm only sad the show didn't continue, because it grew on me more and more, and seemed to be getting better by the episode. The setting was also quite unique and very enjoyable.

I'm finally getting to watch the seasons of Gunsmoke I hadn't seen, starting with eight. Chester is in the show much less this season, sadly, but there's a new character in the form of half-Comanche blacksmith Quint, and so far he's both a delight and quite easy on the eyes. There's also the episode "Us Haggens" which introduces Festus, long before he'd become a regular. His voice is quite different, and he doesn't have all his quirks yet, nor his beloved Ruth, but I can see the roots of the character I'd learn to love, even then. I also found it interesting how he's likeable, but not quite as sweet and slightly more intelligent than the later character. Among other excellent episodes is the delightful and heart-tugging "I Call Him Wonder", a flawless prequel to one of my favorite later season episodes. By season eleven, Doc and Festus, now a regular, have a wonderful banter and friendship going, and I adored episodes like "Wishbone" where Festus cares for Doc who's been bitten by a snake, and another episode where Festus has been badly beaten up and Doc worries over him. Quint is sadly gone, though, replaced by Thad, the only character in the show I've ever disliked. In truth, Thad is harmless, although far from charismatic and very dull compared to all other deputies Matt had, but I've always had such an irrational loathing of him.

I'm on season four of Maverick now and it's a delight. I've always been unusual in that I've never cared for Bret and found his episodes far less interesting for the most part. Filling his place is cousin Beau who is fine so far, and Bart has a bit more episodes than usual, all of which are excellent.

New this season is The Shannara Chronicles, an absolute treasure so far. It's pulling heavy inspiration from Tolkien, but I don't mind because its old fantasy, and therefore different from most current tv and films that draw from more recent novels. It's undoubtedly one of the most gorgeous shows I've ever seen, with the lush backdrop of New Zealand mingled with tactful cgi and well-done filming, costumes, and props, all a richly detailed and offbeat blend of Medieval high fantasy merged with post-dystopian futurism. I love the beautiful opening credits which quickly explain the background and mythos of the series. The whole show has a slightly modernized tinge over the feel of the Kiwi shows of the '90s I grew up on, making me both happy and somewhat nostalgic at the same time. I love the vast majority of the characters, and nearly all of the male ones, helped by a likable cast and the refreshing lack of common tropes in most of their personalities. Wil is a complete sweetheart, and its a joy to have a protagonist who is mostly inept at fighting, admits fear, sorrow, and horror, and would much rather be a healer than go on an epic quest. Allanon is fabulous, a perfect mix of dry wit and slightly spooky power; and I adore the writers for, once, not killing off the mentor character at first convenience. I love his relationship with Wil, and I'm always a sap for the magic comes at a cost trope. Ander is sweet, and I absolutely adore his relationship with Amberle, and have so many headcanons about how he poured all his love into her because of his father's rejection, brother's death, and his other brother's seeming indifference toward him. On a shallow note, his looks are absolutely stunning, too. Bandon is a precious baby, and I'm so worried for him, especially concerning his gift. I'm not fond of Eretria, but I appreciate the layers of her character, and the realism of a life of abuse having shaped her into what she is, while still showing flashes of a good, yet scarred heart beneath it all. Amberle seems sweet but I dislike her with Wil, and that seems to be half of her personality.

In other new shows there's Legends of Tomorrow, a delightfully zany and surprisingly emotional mash up of heroes that results in just about the most overtly comic book series I've ever seen. Snagged from other DC shows, I know most of the characters already, especially my baby, Ray, thankfully on a much better show and surrounded by a better cast, but still as precious and nerdy as ever. Heat Wave is growing on me a lot, and I already loved Captain Cold, Professor Stein, and Jax. The only brand new character is Rip Hunter and he's great so far, even if often exasperated and shady. AI Gideon is also fun.

Also new is Outsiders, an intriguing and highly unusual series. The characters are interesting and layered - I adore Asa, the setting - and contrast between the ways of life - is fascinating, and I enjoy the relationships, especially Hasil and Sally Ann.

Daredevil is back for season two, bringing with it all the unique things that set it apart from and make it more deeply thought-provoking than other superhero shows with its realism, haunting cinematography, long scenes of dialogue, and poignant character study as it fleshes out its characters and thankfully narrow setting. Added to the always fascinating supporting characters this season is Frank Castle, an intriguing and layered character. I loved his clashes and eventual alliance - including saving his life - with Matt, and despite his violent, morally grey actions, I enjoyed his more tender moments, such as his love for his family and dog. Also new is Elektra, a character I enjoyed in the movie, and is even better here, both in her own complex morality, and her poignant relationship with Matt. I loved seeing the priest, Claire, and Wilson Fisk again, and only wish they could have been in it more. While there were some things I found unnecessary or unwanted - Foggy and Matt's breakup rehash of season one, the less focused storyline, and especially the Matt/Karen forced and annoying romance angle - I loved so many moments, especially Matt getting his new sticks, and all the returning supporting characters. I was disappointed in Karen's character, which, while troubled and somewhat traumatized last season, was far more interesting and likable as opposed to how whiny and annoying she came across this season. Despite the forced chemistry at first, I grew to enjoy her scenes with Frank, and she seemed much more like her season one character with him.

I went to see X Men: Apocalypse in theatres, and it was fabulous, definitely my second or third favorite film of the series so far. Charles has finally stepped into the role of the kindly professor I loved, and his character growth is a delight to behold. I also enjoyed the unique explanation for how he ended up bald, even if I'm going to miss his fantastic hair. Erik breaks my heart, as usual, and the death of his family was devastatingly cruel - I so wanted to see more of his little daughter's animal mutation, and their scenes together were so touching and tender. I adored Charles and Erik's scenes together - their balance between friend and enemy is my favorite relationship in the series - and I inwardly shrieked when Erik swung to the X-Men's sides and dropped the huge metal X in front of Charles to protect him from Apocalypse. I also loved that the movie ended on a hopeful note for their relationship. Despite my reservations, I quickly grew to love the younger versions of the characters: Storm was fascinating, Scott was as precious as his adult version, and surprisingly, I liked Jean a lot more than the adult who I've never really cared for. I loved her saving Charles by unleashing her power, showing a flipped parallel to the darkness of her character in the original films. I'm horribly upset about Alex, though, and cling to the hope that he'll come back alive in some future film, since his body was never shown. Nightcrawler, a favorite of mine from the original films, was precious, and I adored every moment with him. Angel was a fascinating character, and I only wish there had been redemption for him, or at least more time, as his story seemed ripe for more exploration than it got. It was nice to see Mystique fully with the good guys by the end, and I love that she seems to be staying to train the new kids. Quicksilver was as much of a treasure as last movie, with a delightfully expanded role. I was a little disappointed he never told Erik he was his son, but his perfect mix of poignancy and quirky humor warmed my heart. His song sequence was endearing, and I was extremely worried when Apocalypse hurt him, but thankful when things ended happily for him. Apocalypse was an intriguing, although under-developed villain. I loved the concept of him - his gaining powers through body transference - and the few glimpses given of how he viewed the world, but he lacked full motivation for his actions. Wolverine's cameo was an unexpected and beautiful scene. I adored Jean giving him a memory, and the fact that he never spoke highlighted how good an actor Hugh Jackman is, with all the emotions he conveyed through his eyes.

I stumbled across Beyond the Prairie, and despite my reservations and few annoyances, mainly Laura being blonde - I'm far from a book purist on anything, but an absolute stickler than Laura must have brown hair - I enjoyed it quite a bit. It's pretty cute and a complete delight to see some of my favorite things from The Long Winter, my favorite book of the series, and the one thing I was always so sad the tv show didn't include. I've had a massive crush on Cap Garland since I was little, and despite him not being what I imagine I still shrieked like a schoolgirl at finally having him on my screen, even if only for a few short scenes. I also loved the inclusion of the blizzard, and Almanzo and Cap's journey for the wheat, especially Almanzo and Laura's adorable reunion scene. In other favorites, he voice over was lovely, Mary was sweet and I would have loved to see more of her, and baby Rose was so precious.

I watched The Huntsman: Winter's War and was left with mixed feelings. While I adored seeing the Huntsman again, and finally getting his backstory, I hated how much was retconned, particularly Ravenna's death and the Huntsman's wife. Female warriors are one of my least favorite type of characters, and I could see nothing in Sara's character that resembled Snow White as the first film implied. Freya was an unnecessary addition to the story, and greatly boring with the exception of the final few minutes that made me feel a bit of sympathy for her. Many of the other characters, like the other Huntsman, who I would have liked to see more of, were underused, and the dwarves were wasted in comic relief. The plor seemed overstuffed and muddled, and while pretty, failed to measure up to the beautifully dark and imaginative first movie. Saddest of all, to me, Snow White married the Prince, eliminating all the implications of the first movie that the Huntsman had taken that role, having been the one to kiss her awake.

In other new movies I watched Gods Of Egypt with low expectations, and ended up adoring it. It's very much a '90s style adventure story, with delightful fun, a lighter-hearted, more straight forward feel than most films today, and some wonderful friendship feels between Bek and Horus, whose relationship was my favorite thing in the movie. I enjoyed the somewhat fanciful but partially faithful depiction of mythological events, and how they wove into the story, like Horus's eyes. Horus was a lovely character, growing emotionally throughout the story until becoming a kind and good kind, and Bek was endearing. Next was the stunning and deeply moving Mr. Nobody. In addition to being one of the most beautifully filmed movies I've ever seen, it was incredibly thought-provoking, and a flawless mix of tragic poignancy and quiet inspiration. The cast was all superb - I'm absolutely in love with Jared Leto's eyes on a shallow note - and the plot was full of imagination. Next was the gorgeous On Drakon, a beautifully filmed and acted fairytale story with elements of Beauty and the Beast, but better. I've longed for human shape-shifted dragons in a fantasy for years and finally got one in Arman, a sweet and heartbreakingly sad character fighting his dragon side and the evil his race has committed. The mythology behind the dragons, especially their birth, was fascinating and dark, and I adored when the conclusion was him not becoming human but rather learning to control the dragon. The romance was sweet, and the ending so precious I couldn't stop smiling. Next was The Legend of Tarzan, the Tarzan movie I've been longing for for years. The tone was perfect, the cinematography and music gorgeous, and the relationship between Tarzan and Jane was the heart of it all, a beautiful, realistic, and powerful love story. I was a little saddened that there weren't more flashbacks, but I have an absolute weakness for married couples deeply in love, and the story hit so many of my beloved tropes. The ending was adorable, too. Next was the inspiring and lovely Hallmark movie Front of the Class. I loved that it was a true story, and James Wolk was so good at the role.

I discovered and have been watching the adorable and imaginative Tinkerbell animated film series, which fills out the backstory of the Peter Pan character. I love the world of Pixie Hollow, with all it's imaginative concepts - fairies painting ladybugs and stripes on bumblebees and the flower bulbs with legs - and I love the other fairy characters, especially Terrence and the sweet little Fawn.
 
 
feeling: hungry
calliope tune: "Green Fields"-Brothers Four
 
 
Kathleen
I managed to watch the first episode of Atlantis the same day it premiered and while it scrambled mythology, I completely adored it. The settings, costumes, and soundtrack were gorgeous, the cast is quite attractive (I'm loving Jason's dimples!), and the story is very fun so far. Pythagoras is completely adorable, and I love the friendship starting between Jason and he. The humor struck a good balance with the more serious moments, and even if the pace was a little fast, I thought it was a great start for a pilot and very promising. Onto episode two which wasn't quite as good as the pilot (and no Jason and Pythagoras friendship, sadly), and had me cringing at the dreadful imagining of satyrs, but still gets points for including the maenads. I love Medusa and am mourning her fate already, since against my better judgement I'm slightly shipping her with Jason - she did save his life after all!. I only wish they'd cut back on some of the fate and simply let Jason and Pythagoras get into all sorts of fun, mythological adventures before they start in on future tragedies. "A Boy Of No Consequence" was fun, and thankfully toned down much of the humor of the first two episodes. Ariadne was somewhat less bland when she stood up to the queen, and I could tolerate Hercules a little better, but the witchcraft bits were unnecessary. The hurt/comfort parts were lovely, and I adored how Jason got everyone to work as a team, and his gymnastics, as well as Medusa saving the day. I'm a little sad to see the writers trying to pair her up with Hercules though, since I'd hoped for her to be matched up with Jason. "Twist Of Fate" was superb, mixing adorable moments with more serious. I adored the trio being so cute with the baby, and even Hercules grew on me this week. Jason was fabulous as always, using his gymnastic skills to full advantage, and the baby's mother was a fascinating character and superb actress. I hope to see more of the king and she in the future. I love the show's rare continuity of having Jason's arm bear a scar from the arrow wound in the pilot. "White Lies" had too much Ariadne but I loved Minos finally getting screentime. He's quite a tragic character, and I love his relationship with Ariadne. Jason was awkwardly adorable through the whole episode, and I couldn't stop giggling over Hercules and his pet beetle. "The Song of The Sirens" threw a new spin on things as Jason, desperate to save Medusa and Hercules, makes a rash pact with Circe the witch to kill Pasiphae. I loved Pythagoras and Jason's friendship in the episode, along with the character growth of the Oracle, who, while still mysterious, obviously cares deeply about Jason. The final scene between them when she takes his hand was especially touching. "Rules Of Engagement" was little more than fun, flawless fan service for 99% of the show as Jason does gymnastics and is soundly whumped all while forgetting his shirt at home (why am I not surprised by now?), but it still offered a cute moment where Hercules and Medusa patch things up, and the first glimpse of future darkness as recurring character and palace servant Korrina is needlessly murdered. Poor Korrina, I'd hoped for a bit more from her in the future, but I can't say I'm surprised as I already guessed she wouldn't last forever on the show. Still it only makes me hate Pasiphae more. "The Furies" was an uneven episode consisting of an intriguing premise poorly executed against some stunning acting by Robert Emms and beautiful moments of friendship between not only Jason and Pythagoras but also Hercules and the two; I especially loved the part where Hercules starts to crawl away to deter Pythagoras from giving himself to the furies. "Pandora's Box" brings back the show from hiatus, and I love seeing everyone again, even if it's the most heartbreaking episode yet. Medusa's transformation wasn't unexpected, but I'd hoped it wouldn't be so soon, and the final scene with Jason cursing the gods was stunning and foreboding for the rest of the series. "The Price Of Hope" was mostly a filler full of running but it gave some lovely h/c moments as Pythagoras cared for an injured Jason, a beautiful friendship moment between Hercules and Pythagoras, and a strange twist as Jason is able to look at Medusa. "Hunger Pangs" was hilarious, a wonderful breath of fresh air after weeks of sad episodes, and Jason was adorable as a werewolf who frequently ends up devoid of clothes in strange places. I'd love to see hints of it pop up in later episodes, even if the silver did cure him. "Touched By The Gods" was a "royal episode" as I call it, which means less fun for me than the trio-focused ones which are my favorites, but still the plot offered some resolution to earlier stories as well as a new depth to Jason. I was secretly wishing he'd kill Pasiphae, and I found it odd that he couldn't bring himself to kill her yet killed Circe, who seemed less evil to me of the two, without much of a thought. Still he did selflessly offer himself to her to be killed, showing how much he cares about his friends, and the trio had some wonderful moments that were both funny and heartwarming as they try to help Jason fulfill his vow and then join him battling the living skeletons - a nice nod to Jason and the Argonauts. Jason and the gang's rescue of Ariadne was fun, complete with the always enjoyable bonus of flaming arrows, but I was saddened by the servant's death. On the bright side Heptarian is thankfully gone now, in a strangely quick way, unless the writers are planning to bring him back. The leper colony intrigued me, as well as Jason's long-lost father being among them, and I loved seeing the brief father-son interaction even if Jason isn't aware of who he is. The twist of Pasiphae being his mother made me happy, since, unlike the rest of the fandom it seems, I'd considered it at the beginning but doubted the writers would go that way no matter how much I hoped, and the revelation finally opened up some explanations as to Jason's mysterious gifts. My other favorite parts were Hercules finally admitting he cares about Jason and Hercules nearly crushing Pythagoras by attempting to hide him from the soldiers.

In other brand new shows I've started watching Sleepy Hollow against my better judgement, and quite surprisingly ended up obsessed with it. The premise is creative and incredibly fascinating, and I love Ichabod. I've always been interested in the Revolutionary War and the overlap with history to fantasy is amazing. I'm also liking Ichabod's friendship with Abbie. The writing is brilliant so far and the bad guys, especially the creepy Sandman, are well done against some stunning filming. "John Doe" was superb and my favorite episode so far, with an awesome tale of Roanoke, Ichabod's modern day confusion and old-world gallantry when he takes Abbie's hand to cross the water, and some delicious hurt/comfort and heartwarming moments. Plus Ichabod speaking Middle English and interacting with the boy made my heart melt. "The Sin Eater", drawing from a fascinating Welsh tradition, was brimming with wonderful moments from the hilarious baseball game scene, to Ichabod's swoon-worthy bow, to the poignant and gorgeous exchange as Ichabod prepares to give up his life to defeat the Horseman. Despite my best efforts I've fallen off the wagon and started shipping Ichabod/Abbie hard so I teared up when he finally called her by her first name and later when they hugged. I also liked understanding Katrina's backstory better with the intriguing parts where Ichabod first learned of his gifts and part in the war. "Sanctuary" was a fun haunted house story with a shocking twist as it's revealed Ichabod has a son, born after his death. While on one hand I love it - daddy!Ichabod could be adorable, and even if his son is long dead there still could be a great+ grandchild somewhere, I have a bad feeling about the tragic directions this storyline could take. A darker side of Ichabod has surfaced, too, especially in the scene where he kills the tree creature. "The Golem" was haunting, exploring the fate of Ichabod's son Jeremy - I can only hope the writers will bring him back to life or at least include more flashbacks in the future - as well as Katrina's coven - an extremely creepy set of four women. I loved seeing the Sin Eater again, and Ichabod's Christmas confusion made me giggle as usual, especially the adorable scene where Abbie gives him a stocking, but the ending has me barely able to wait for the show's return.

Despite not planning on it I took a peek at Once Upon A Time In Wonderland and completely fell in love with it's version of the tale. Cyrus and Alice's romance is beautiful and I hope so badly that it has a happy end. Also the Knave of Hearts is wonderful, I just adore him. "The Serpent" was the most heartwrenching episode so far as Jafar's evil origins are revealed, and Alice is finally forced to make a wish to save the Knave's life, tying her life to his in the process, but sadly all for nothing as the Knave is turned to stone. The ending left me in tears, despite the hope of Cyrus beginning to escape, and the lovely wishbone legend, and I can only hope next episode will have more light at the end of the tunnel. "The Cell" was another step forward as well as a step back as Alice uses her second wish which broke my heart, but she and her father managed to mend their relationship even if the ending implies that her father won't remember anything, indicating another sacrifice Alice has made that goes unrealized. It finally occurred to me that every character is motivated by love in some way, and each love is contrasted from Knave and Anastasia's lost love to Jafar's pining for his father's love, to the true, beautiful love between Cyrus and Alice that motivates everything she does. Sophie Lowe was stunning in the episode as usual, bringing out all of Alice's emotions and pain, especially in the scene where she talks about her childhood to her "father", and the Knave and her friendship was as lovely as always. Cyrus, sadly, had the smallest part ever, speaking only one line and in two scenes, out cold except for a few seconds. The final pieces of Jafar's childhood was revealed, and while I understand him a lot better now, and even feel a little sorry for him, I still side with the other prisoner. He saved Cyrus, after all. "Home" was stunning, with Cyrus and Alice finally reunited, Cyrus getting far more screentime than usual, and a shocking twist ending The opening flashback of Cyrus and Alice beneath the stars was gorgeous, and I loved the creation of their little home, with Cyrus giving up his only treasure to protect Alice. Also I guessed right about genies once being human, so I'm looking forward to flashbacks of Cyrus's history. Emma Rigby impressed me the most, going from an unlikeable, overly done character to a compelling, tragic one, and I loved how she slowly reverted to her Anastasia accent and mannerisms, even as my heart broke when the Knave rejected her. The end twist was incredible - I'd forgotten about Alice promising the Knave a wish - and I'm both thrilled that Cyrus is free and Alice is well and also saddened by the Knave's fate, even if I know he'll be a hilariously fun genie.

I've also become very fond of Reign which more than makes up for it's lack of historical authenticity with beauty and endearing characters, especially the gorgeous Bash whose blue eyes take my breath away. I love his relationship with his half brother Francis - I've always been a sap for brothers - and Mary: I ship them against my better judgement, and little Charles is adorable. The castle is stunning, too, and I'm intrigued by the mysterious Clarissa. Plus the series is slowly introducing some more complicated twists and delightful whump so, for now at least, it makes me happy.

I've started watching Almost Human and completely fell in love with it. Both Dorian and John are realistic, far from perfect characters who are easy to relate to, and I love their odd friendship and hilarious banter. Plus, it's been ages since I've seen a sci-fi that could pull off such a far-fetched, seemingly emotionless premise with so much heart and feeling.

I've finished season two of Stargate Atlantis and there's something of a different feel so far as Atlantis is now commanded by military - complete with an alien - and Sheppard gets more reckless than ever in his heroics. I'm iffy on Teyla's ability to now communicate with the wraith as the result of her genes and preferred when it was simply her sensing their presence. but she's still one of the few female tv characters I consider awesome and she finally gets to share more scenes with Sheppard to my shipping delight. I'm getting more used to McKay now, mostly because of his humor and bravery in going after Sheppard in "Aurora", and I laughed through the hilarious "Duet" which forces him to share a body with a woman. Much to my sadness Ford has vanished from the series in one of the worst and most tragic write-outs ever as the result of wraith enzymes from surviving a feeding which makes him violent and unstable. He winds up fleeing through the stargate and, despite another appearance which got my hopes up to his return, then escaping again when Sheppard finally tracks him down. He turns up once again but the series leaves his fate hopeful but hanging as he's last seen aboard a wraith ship. Yet the episode was a bittersweet memory of the first season toward the end with Ford risking his life to let Sheppard escape, and Sheppard finally calling him by his first name. Filling the gap left by Ford, but thankfully not replacing him, is Ronon, a runner hunted for sport by the wraith, who they discover when searching for Ford. While a little hostile at first, he's so far a complex and fascinating character with good chemistry with Sheppard, a strong devotion to the team, and a staggering array of fighting skills which promises some fun in the future. The season's best episodes include the intriguing "Instinct" which provides a new, almost human side to the wraith in a tragic story of a man who rescues and raises a wraith child as his daughter, and "The Long Goodbye", which despite focusing so much on Elizabeth who I still don't like, had some fascinating moments. I liked Ronon going after Sheppard himself, but he worried me when he was so badly shot, even if watching Carson operate with the power out was awesome. Also Teyla's scene where she agonizes over whether to kill Sheppard and save the people was stunning. Onto season three now and it's fascinating so far, picking up where the finale left off by continuing the somewhat tragic storyline of Michael, a wraith turned into a human by Carson's retrovirus. That's followed by the stunning episode "Sateda", a team story that finds Ronon again at the mercy of the wraith. It was filled with beautiful moments that had me tearing up, especially Sheppard admitting how he cares about his friends and Ronon willing to cut his own throat to force the people to let Teyla and Sheppard go. My heart bled for Ronon during the backstory moments, and I completely fell in love with him when he hugged Carson in the adorable ending. Other excellent episodes include the intriguing "Phantoms" where the team begins to hallucinate from a wraith device. I found Teyla being unaffected and Sheppard's vision being attempting to save a soldier he lost to be interesting insights into their characters. More is revealed about the ancients in the episode "Progeny" which features one of the most haunting closing scenes so far, as well as the wraith in the fantastic "Common Ground" in which Sheppard finds himself working with a wraith to escape from prison, an agreement which results in the wraith restoring the life he drained from him. McKay's best of the season is the funny and heartwarming "McKay and Mrs. Miller" featuring a parallel Rodney (I would have loved to see his team!) and McKay's sister. Ronan's wonderful friendship with Sheppard continues to delight me, with highlights including a hilarious scene where Sheppard teaches him to play golf. Happily the pop culture references are even more frequent now, and the team friendship is even better than last season. The last episodes of the season take a startling and incredibly tragic turn with Carson's death which turned me into an emotional wreck. I loved Carson dearly, and even though his death was heroic and poignant, I still hated that he was written out of the series that way. I'm on season four, now, and there's several changes so far. The somewhat annoying replicators storyline has finally found a good plot point in allowing for the removal of Elizabeth from the series; in her place is Sam, and I'm already loving her as the leader, which I'd hoped and supposed I would after enjoying her guest appearances. Ronan gets to shine, and finally has his place in the team cemented, in the excellent "Reunion" which forces him to choose between Atlantis and a trio of survivors from his old home, complete with a poignant twist ending. "Doppelganger" is a fascinating study in nightmares in which Sheppard confronts his deepest fear - himself. Everyone had some wonderful moments, especially Sheppard - the fight scene between his double and he was a delicious guilty pleasure - and McKay, plunging back into the dream machine after nearly dying just to save Sheppard. I loved the beautiful team moment at the end, as well as the awkward but adorably sweet hug between Sheppard and Teyla. "Tabula Rasa", in which a mysterious virus wipes the memories of everyone but Teyla and Ronon in Atlantis, is a fascinating, stunning episode. I loved how Ronon was able to talk Sheppard into trusting him, as well as McKay saving the day. Ive finally learned to adore McKay and my heart hurt and then was so happy for him at the beautiful ending. I love his sweet romance with Katie and hope they have a happy ending. "Miller's Crossing" was an unusual episode which highlighted how much McKay has changed when he offers to sacrifice himself to a wraith to save his dying sister, as well as showing a strangely dark side to Sheppard in which he convinces another man to volunteer in McKay's place. I loved McKay and Jeannie's relationship, though. The downsides to the season are the ever dull replicator storylines, Teyla's odd personality change in "Missing", going from a deeply caring character to a harsh and cold person who's willing to abandon a wounded stranger to die, and Dr. Keller, a tolerable but sadly lacking so-called replacement for Carson who I miss terribly. "The Kindred" both warmed and completely broke my heart by bringing Carson back - as a clone but so Carson I was tearing up within seconds of hearing his Scottish accent. I loved how the team grew to accept him, tried to save him, and were finally forced to keep him asleep until a cure can be found in one of the most tear-jerking goodbyes ever. On top of that was the season finale, the utterly stunning "The Last Man" in which Sheppard, returning through the gate, finds himself in a desolate Atlantis and is forced to return to the past and prevent his friends' deaths. Ronon and Todd, who I grew to love through the season, dying together broke me, as well as McKay spending twenty-five years trying to change the past, and then dying alone like that, leaving a hologram to wait for Sheppard. I sobbed when he wanted to help him when Sheppard was half-dead from the storm and he couldn't even touch him because he wasn't real. The cliff-hanging finale left me biting my nails, and I know I'm going to be a wreck next season.

The Doctor Who 50th was better than I'd been expecting. I was bracing myself for a letdown, and while a lot disappointed me, on the whole I really enjoyed it. Ten seemed mostly in character, I was so happy to see him again, and I was able to cope with my dislike for Eleven for the most part. I really liked the girl with the scarf, especially in the adorable scene where she makes friends with the alien. My favorite thing was the nods to classic!who: the B&W opening, Four's scarf, Kate being the Brigadier's daughter, Jack being mentioned, the pictures including Martha, Kamelion, Tegan, Nyssa, and others, and the "round things". I laughed so hard at the comment at Americans, history, and movies, as well as the "midlife crisis" comment. I shrieked when they had all 13 Doctors turn up twice; if they weren't going to include the old actors it was the next best thing, and it made me so happy to catch a glimpse of Five in the 50th. I also loved Tom Baker's cameo. The story was odd; I loved seeing the Time War, Gallifrey, and all the Time Lord children, but it felt like cheating since destroying Gallifrey shaped Nine and Ten's characters so much - they're so different from the old Doctors because of what they've done, and it cheapened the impact of all they'd done to change it all. I enjoyed The Five(ish) Doctors even better, though. Peter Davison and the others were delightful and parts made me giggle while other scenes had me tearing up from nostalgia, especially the comment about the Tardis no longer "wobbling", and Peter Davison saying his typical "must dash", just like Five again. "The Time Of The Doctor" had more human, personal elements than is typical of Eleven's era, and while I'm not at all sad to see him go I did get a little emotional at the Doctor growing old defending the little town of Christmas, as well as his friendship with the child. I disliked the dig at Ten's so-called "vanity", the messed-up plot jammed with too many aliens to make sense, and I hate the constant reset button that follows every bad event; at least in the original show and Nine's and Ten's eras there were severe, deeply tragic consequences whereas now the Doctor can do pretty much whatever he wants and just rewrite it all. I also don't really care for Clara, although I think I could learn to tolerate her with a good Doctor. I'm willing to accept the new regeneration cycle, though, as random as it is, if only in the hope that future Doctors, and, oh please, runners of the show will get things right again, as well as the fact that I don't think I could bear to watch the Doctor truly die, for the sake of all he was. Twelve, though, in his few moments, was wonderful, both hilarious and instantly appealing, and I'm happily looking forward to adventures with him.

In absence of new OUATIW I've started watching season one of Once Upon A Time which both frustrates and gives me intense bursts of wistfulness for OUATIW while managing to make me come back for more. I love the fairytale world and the unusual, often clever twists on common fairytales, as well as all the characters from different stories existing in the same world. I like Prince Charming and all the flashbacks to his story, although I don't care for David or Storybrooke, oddly enough. I also liked Graham, and was shocked and saddened by what happened to him, since he was just getting depth and emotion. The best episode so far is the stunning "Skin Deep" which made me fall in love with Rumplestiltskin/Belle, as well as seeing Rumplestiltskin in a different light. I loved all the Disney parallels, and for the first time the Storybrooke part tied in perfectly with the fairytale ones, in a beautiful, haunting way. The ending was shocking, but I loved the poignancy of Rumplestiltskin keeping the chipped cup, as well as the twist that he remembers his identity, and thus Belle, too. August is one of my favorites so far, and I adore both his character and storyline. Jefferson is also wonderful and deeply tragic, as is his attempts to reunite with his little daughter Grace. The season finale was unexpected but I loved that the curse is broken and the characters are reunited. I teared up when Rumplestiltskin saw Belle alive for the first time, and again when she remembered him.

In new superhero films I finally saw Thor: The Dark World and it was wonderful, quite different than what I'd expected but very good. I adored the concept of the gaps between the worlds with the characters falling in and out of them, as well as the intriguing backstory of the dark elves. Thor has grown up so much since the first film, and I love his character even more now. For the first time I felt sympathy for Loki, as well as liking him just a little, and it was wonderful to see Thor and he fighting side by side again instead of fighting each other, as well as getting to see so much of Loki's magic. I was saddened by Frigga's death, but I loved that she believed in Loki right until the end, and died heroically. Loki's reaction to her death, and the scene they shared before that were heartbreaking, adding depth to Loki's tragic nature. Thor and Loki's banter during the escape was hilarious, as was Loki's response to everyone threatening his life, and I laughed at Loki turning into Captain America. Thor and Jane's relationship was less appealing to me than last time for some reason, but I did love her risking her life to try to save him toward the end of the battle. Darcy and Ian kept me giggling and I ended up shipping them. The end twist was jaw-dropping, leaving me both happy Loki survived his "death" as well as concerned for the future with him up to his old tricks.

In other new films I saw the beautiful and touching Remember Sunday. I loved the characters and the actors who played them; they were perfect, and Gus and Molly's relationship was believable while still being sweet. I giggled at some parts - like Gus's constant shock over his friend's divorce - and teared up at others, and the comet bits were so lovely. I liked the hopeful, if somewhat bittersweet ending, too. Next was the surprisingly excellent Snow White and the Huntsman, the best version I've seen of the fairytale yet which brought emotion and true personality to the characters where previous versions have failed. Chris Hemsworth was superb as the troubled, yet good-hearted Huntsman, a character I've long adored, and I loved his accent, as well as the hints of romance between Snow White and he, as well as the fact that his kiss and not William's saved her. William was a somewhat fun character, even if his role felt limited in places, and I enjoyed the flashbacks to his childhood with Snow White. Kirsten Stewart was shockingly good at the role, making me change my mind about her acting, and the visuals were gorgeous. I liked the dwarves actually doing something instead of simply comic relief, and the Queen was even more evil than usual, meeting a more fitting end than most versions. Next was Love's Christmas Journey, a sweet, and thankfully more improved installment in the Love Comes Softly series. I liked the characters, as well as seeing little Aaron all grown up and being a wonderful father, and the end was lovely. After that was The Courageous Heart of Irena Sendler, an inspiring true story of a woman who risked her life to save Jewish children during the Holocaust. I loved actually seeing the real lady at the end, and that her story managed to have a happy ending after all she endured, and I loved that she and Stefan found each other in the end. The subplot of the man and his son was poignant and deeply sad, too, and the entire story and filming reminded me a lot of my beloved Hidden In Silence or Miracle At Midnight. After that was The Magic Of Ordinary Days, a lovely, old-fashioned film with a slow-moving plot and slow-growing love story that captivated my heart. The characters felt real and the ending was beautiful. Next was the fun western adventure American Outlaws which, while playing fast and loose with history, was action-packed and a treat to watch, especially with Jesse's shooting tricks, the heroic rescues, and multiple explosions. Then was the heartbreaking and beautiful romance The Lost Valentine. I cried more than I have during any film but I loved it, especially Neil and Caroline's love story. Next was the lovely Heaven Knows Mr. Allison, a moving and poignant mix of love story and war drama with a very human aspect.
 
 
feeling: drunk
calliope tune: "Some Memories Just Won't Die"-Marty Robbins