Kathleen
22 May 2016 @ 11:08 am
All my fanfics.

Days turned into weeks, weeks turned into months. And then, one not so very special day, I went to my typewriter, I sat down, and I wrote our story. A story about a time, a story about a place, a story about the people. But above all things, a story about love. )
 
 
calliope tune: "The Gallant Shearers"-Tannahill Weavers
feeling: working
 
 
 
Kathleen
I discovered the amazing 1994 miniseries The Stand and have slowly been working my way through it. I love the slow pace, the dystopian yet hopeful world, the themes of good vs. evil, and the wonderfully diverse characters, especially Nick - I'm still broken over his death and Tom. Stu is my favorite, and I love how he's just an ordinary man, nothing special or chosen like the worn out trope nowadays, and yet such a good, decent guy you can't help loving him. He had me worried quite a bit near the end but I'm so happy he pulled through and got his happy ending with Frannie and the baby.

I also saw the Polish miniseries version of Quo Vadis and while the start took me a bit to catch my interest I grew to love it. The characters were all intriguing and the film had a realistic edge to the historical details. I loved how Marcus changed over the story and grew into a kind, decent person, and I was happy to see Lygia and he get their happy ending.

I went to see the new Cinderella in theatres and it was absolutely beautiful. As much as I enjoy re-imagined fairytales, there's nothing as flawless as the true story told faithfully. The actors were all perfect, and I adored Cinderella, Kit, the Captain, and all the wonderful animals, especially the dear little mice. The Fairy Godmother was delightful, and the special effects were stunning, the perfect balance of real and CGI, and the costumes, especially the dress for the ball were breathtaking. I loved the gentle added touches like Kit and his father and the Stepmother discovering the glass slipper, and the ending was beyond wonderful.

I've heard about The Matrix since it was popular when I was a kid so I finally caved in and watched it. It took a few minutes to grab me but once I did I fell in love with it. As much as I get tired of the main character being "the One", I adored Neo, for his skills, confusion, and incredible fashion sense - I seriously want to steal those coats. I loved his relationship with Trinity, too, and Morpheus with his unwavering faith in him. The action scenes were amazing; I loved the slow motion photography of the bullets and the awesome fight scenes, and I couldn't stop laughing during the scene when Neo goes through the metal detector and shows how many guns he has. Next was The Matrix Reloaded which I enjoyed as much as the first one. I loved the parallels with Neo saving Trinity's life to when she saved his, and Neo's new skills, especially his ability to see all the coding and to fly, were awesome. Last was The Matrix Revolutions, a flawed but poignant finale to the trilogy. I was saddened by Trinity's senseless death, and Neo's ambiguous fate but I loved how the story was tied up in a bittersweet ending, and the last scene, with the Oracle and other characters, was beautiful.

The next Flowers In the Attic movie, If There Be Thorns, aired, and I loved it, far more than the last and a little bit more than the first. I liked seeing Cathy and Chris as adults, hiding their secrets while still deeply in love, even as the tragedy of their pasts continues to impact their children. I liked some resolution and even redemption for their mother in the end, and how Jory accepted and defended his parents after all. The little girl was precious, too. Next was the final movie, Seeds Of Yesterday which crushed me. I liked that the second generation was finally able to break free of the past and find their happy endings, especially Jory who more than deserved it, but I secretly wanted Bart to get what he deserved. Cathy and Chris made my heart ache, and it broke me that they weren't able to be happy in the end, with Chris's death, and Cathy never free of the shadow of the attic. The comments about yellow and the flowers were poignant, and the ending with Cathy finally seeing the paper flowers made me tear up.

Out of curiosity I gave a try to one of the older Anne Of Green Gables movies, starting with the sequel 1940's Anne Of Windy Poplars and was delighted by it. While it took me a bit to adjust to the new cast, I grew to love the sweet yet spunky version of Anne, the gentle, steady Gilbert, and dear little Betty. I adored that Gilbert and Anne took her in at the ending, and the setting, especially the picnic was beautifully idyllic. I also loved the side characters, like Jabez, and Matey, as well as Katherine and Tony's romance. The story was perfectly done, too, and I loved every minute. After that I went back and watched the 1934 Anne Of Green Gables and while it wasn't as good as the sequel it had some intriguing twists on the story that I enjoyed. I was a bit puzzled by how they switched the backstory and had Gilbert's mother jilt Matthew instead of his father jilting Marilla, but I liked the forbidden romance Anne and Gilbert had, especially the adorable scene where he gives her a locket. Likewise it was strange to have Diana be Rachel's daughter - I suppose the movie, being short, felt it easier to simply combine the characters of Mrs. Berry and Rachel. Gilbert was super adorable, though, even as different as he was, and Anne was even more overly imaginative than usual. I loved the ending, too, especially since they had Matthew live and Marilla accept Gilbert.

In other new films I saw The Lovely Bones which was beautiful and haunting. I adore odd, poignant films and it put a lump in my throat as well as dazzling me with some gorgeous scenery and nostalgia for the '70s. Every character was fascinating and I wanted to spend more time with all of them, but I loved the way the story tied up with a bittersweet, perfect ending. Next was The Kingdom Of Heaven, a gorgeous and often poignant epic. I loved the characters, especially King Baldwin and Balian, and was fascinated by the history I knew very little about. The filming was stunning, and so many scenes made me cry, especially Saladin letting everyone go and then even pausing to right the cross on the altar. Next was Dorian Gray and despite a slow start and straying from the book it ended up being an incredible adaptation. Ben Barnes was stunning as Dorian, capturing the grief, wildness, and insanity of the character while still making me feel sorry for him. I loved the style and effects of the painting, and the filming and scenery was gorgeous. Next was Lorenzo's Oil, a heartbreaking but inspiring story that brought tears to my eyes. I loved the slow pace, gentle, but amazing acting, especially from the little child who played Lorenzo, and the couple's devotion and dedication to trying to save their son. The end was deeply poignant but beautiful. Next was the heartbreaking and thought-provoking My Sister's Keeper which explored a difficult concept and featured stunning acting and realistic characters. I cried so much throughout but the ending was beautifully poignant and moving. Next was the strange and gorgeous La Jetée. I could clearly see the inspiration for my beloved 12 Monkeys, and the style, all in still photographs, was surprisingly non-off-putting, with the narration and images drawing me in instantly and keeping me fascinated to the end. I loved the stark feel of the story, the commentary on small details and sensations, and the poignant ending. After that I saw the beautiful and poignant I Am Sam. The actors, especially little Dakota Fanning, were amazing, and the characters stole my heart. It made me cry and laugh throughout and I loved the ending. Next was the beautiful and heartbreaking La Rafle. I sobbed at the ending and throughout, and was deeply moved by the story.

I'd always meant to see a Rudolph Valentino movie and I finally watched a few of his films this week, starting with The Sheik. While it was a bit over the top I loved the adventure of the plot, and the setting, as well as the characters. He isn't the best silent film actor but he's likeable and his films are very enjoyable.

In new animated films I saw The Lego Movie which was surprisingly good and hilarious, especially Batman's song and line about "only working in black". I loved how it didn't take itself seriously, and the concept was creative and a lot of fun.

I've spent the past week watching the new series Daredevil and it's been a treat, to finally have my superhero get such a good adaptation. I adore the characters, especially Matt, Foggy, and Claire, and Ben and Elena's deaths broke my heart. The writing was amazing, reminded me of all that's missing in most shows of the genre, and I loved that Matt never killed anyone. There were so many beautiful touches: the theme and intro, Matt's Catholic past and conversations with his priest, Karen's realistic reaction to killing someone, and Matt's fiery image of the world.

I've started watching the new Poldark show and it's lovely so far. Aidan Turner pulls off the broody, gothic antihero type nicely, and Demelza is adorable. I'm intrigued by the rivalry and fortunes within the family, as well as the social classes.

Along the same lines, I discovered the glorious Italian romance Elisa Di Rivombrosa and despite my pickiness of period drama I was instantly captivated. The actors and characters grabbed me right away, and the gorgeous setting and lyrical Italian just adds to the feel. Elisa is likeable, and Fabrizio, while not always likeable, is compelling - and on a shallow note has mesmerizing blue eyes - and it's easy to see why they would be drawn to each other and swept off their feet and out of their worlds. The parallels between them and the tragedy of the doctor and his wife make me worried, but I'm intrigued. I also like the other characters, like Fabrizio's mother and dear little neice.

I'm on season two of The Musketeers and despite a bit of a shaky start to the season compared to last, it seems to be finding it's feet. Aramis is taking center stage for the most part, which I don't mind, and I love how he tries to be there for his son, even if he can't be a real father to him. I'm relieved that the Cardinal is gone, but detest his replacement even more than I hated the Cardinal. "Through a Glass Darkly", the best so far, does a perfect job of giving scenes to all the characters, backed against a compelling, nail-biting plot. I'm thrilled D'Artagnan and Constance are back together, and intrigued by the twist in Athos and Milady's relationship. The two part finale, especially "Trial and Punishment" was stunning and the season's best, restoring much of what's been missing since season one. I loved the character growth in the episode, especially Milady saving Aramis and offering to have Athos leave with her, and I liked how their relationship changed even if they're now separated. D'Artagnan saving and marrying Constance made me incredibly happy, even if I'm sad Aramis didn't attend the wedding. I also wish LeMay had survived, since I liked him, and he was so kind to Constance. As sad as it was, I'm grateful the story arc of Aramis and Anne and their son is now resolved, and I'm looking forward to seeing them as the child grows up. Ryan Gage's acting was amazing, as the King is usually a difficult role, and in this episode more than usual. I also liked that they went with the route of Aramis becoming a monk, even though I know it won't last. I'm very intrigued by the war storyline for next season, too.

Onto part two of season four of Once Upon A Time and as much as I miss the last story arc I'm slowly starting to appreciate this one. I love Ursula, especially her backstory, and I loved that she was the first to get her happy ending. My favorite thing is August being back, though, and even if it isn't forever I'm just so happy to have him brightening my screen again, since he was one of the first characters I adored in the show and the one I missed the most. Killian's storyline continues to make me smile and cry, and I've fallen in love with shipping Emma and he - how can I resist when he views her as his happy ending? I'm bitter over what the writers have done to Belle, though, since she seems so OOC, and I hate how they've paired her up with the Knave and destroyed two of my OTPs at once. Rumplestiltskin, even evil, still never fails to break my heart, and I can't help hoping for Belle and he to reunite. "Best Laid Plans" finally reveals the Author, and despite my sadness at it not being August - or even a character we knew - I love the concept of it being a title that passes down (as well as the cute little nod to Walt Disney). August continues to be a treasure, even though his illness worried me, and I love his friendship with Emma. The revelation of Maleficent's daughter wasn't a surprise but it was heartbreaking to see her lose her due to a horrible choice made by Snow and Charming, who continue to corrupt themselves. Rumplestiltskin finally got a scene with Belle, even if she was asleep, and managed to reduce me to tears in only a few lines (I'm still bitter over what she did to him since, even if he was doing something wrong his intentions made sense after all he'd suffered being controlled and losing his son). Onto "Heart Of Gold", and I don't think I've been so disappointed by an ep since the Neverland arc. As much as I loved the glimpse of Oz, there was no need to bring Zelena back. I hated her, hated her storyline, and it was long resolved. She serves no point other than to bring Rumplestiltskin more pain, and provide the writers with the laziest way ever of bringing Robin and Regina back together. Marion deserved better, certainly in regards to the original story, and definitely in regards to Robin himself who the show continues to ruin for me, even if his giving Knave the bottle and deleting Regina from his phone shows that he's improving and slowly becoming a better person. Still Roland remains adorable, and Rumplestiltskin's storyline regarding the damage to his heart from all the evil he's done is intriguing. While "Sympathy for the De Vil" failed to make me feel anything for Cruella and I disliked most of the plot, I liked seeing a better side of the Author and a fascinating 1920s world. Rumplestiltskin and Belle's scene together was heartbreaking, even as wonderful as it was to see them together again, and I'm fascinated by the storyline of Rumplestiltskin's blackening heart. "Lily" was an odd but enjoyable ep, showing Emma's continuing journey to darkness, but it's best scene was Rumplestiltskin and the Knave working together to restore Belle's heart, and Rumplestiltskin giving up Belle to keep her safe and happy. I still hope they can find a way back to each other, but I love that he was willing to leave her alone, instead of harming the Knave. "Operation Mongoose", one of the very best episodes of the series so far, was stunning, giving me what I've longed for but had never hoped would happen: a glimpse into an upside down version of fairytale land. I adored the subtle twists on the characters: Charming's "I'll always find you" even as Snow controls his heart, Snow and Regina's storylines flipped and twisted, and especially Killian, even as a coward with no fighting skills or memory of Emma, dying to save her. I cried when they finally reunited with an adorable hug, and I was so happy Emma finally told him she loved him. I was sad there wasn't a true love's kiss between Belle and Rumplestiltskin, but it thrilled me to hear Belle say she still loves him, and to finally have Rumplestiltskin free of the darkness and the dagger.

I'm on season five of Hercules: the Legendary Journeys and Hercules being separated from Iolaus is killing me. I'm intrigued and heart-broken by the glimpses we get of who Hercules could become without Iolaus - bitter, violent, and dangerous, and even when he starts to care about and help people again, he still seems so different and sad. I enjoy Iolaus II, but he makes me miss Iolaus terribly. But he's very sweet, and I love that he got his happy ending and even found true love. Still the plots are superb this season, and it's great fun to see the show expand it's mythology into other countries, including Celtic and Norse. I especially loved seeing the myth of Baldr come to life. The final episode was beautiful, and I even cried a little when Iolaus learns he can stay alive with Hercules.

I gave a try to Nikita and am quite enjoying it so far. Aaron Stanford is wonderful as Birkhoff, and his friendship with Nikita is adorable. Michael is my favorite, and I ship Nikita and he. I love the gradual growth of his character across season one until he breaks away from Division and joins with Nikita. I'm up to the end of season three now and saddened by the direction the show took. Without the plot of taking down Division the story fails to find its footing and I think it would have been so much better if they'd kept the original storyline all the way to the end since Percy's death would have been the perfect finale. I much preferred Percy as the bad guy with his subtle and creepy manipulation instead of Amanda who comes across as showy, annoying, and over-acting instead of frightening. The worst changes are to the characters, though. Gone is the united, makeshift family of the first two seasons as even the relationships are affected: Nikita and Alex are at each others' throats, and Michael and Nikita have half the scenes together they used to. Michael seems cold and distant, unable to come to terms with the loss of his hand, Sonya, forever annoying, gets far too much screentime, Ryan has gone from a sweetheart to hardened boss, and Nikita is violent, harsh, and much like the people she once fought. Only Birkhoff, the sunshine of the show, seems himself. Sean was never one of my favorites but his death seemed cruel and only to cause Alex, who's already lost too much, more pain. And while the characters come back together by season's end, Owen's storyarc ends tragically when he becomes who he used to be, a hardened killer. I adored Owen, and while it helped that he retains the slightest glimmer of Owen, it's horrible to see him disappear into Sam. Still I'm glad he got so much screentime this season and his snark was the highlight of the episodes.

In other new shows I finally got a chance to see the '60s series It's A Man's World with it's fabulous cast (Randy! Michael Burns! Glenn Corbett! and more), and it was lovely, a gentle and often poignant story.

Also new is The Messengers, and while it's a bit cheesy at times and some of the characters (Vera and Rose) have yet to grow on me, I'm enjoying it. I love Joshua, so far, who seems like a decent, nice guy trying to do the right thing, and Erin and Amy are adorable. Raul is my absolute favorite, and I love his interactions with Erin and Amy. I'm curious as to why only Joshua and Raul's gifts hurt them when the other's, not even Erin's healing, seems to affect her, and looking forward to seeing who the seventh angel will be.

I've started watching IZombie and while it's not perfect I love it's quirky, offbeat humor and loveable characters. Ravi is adorable, Liv is so easy to relate to, and Lowell is a gift that keeps on giving - plus it's wonderful to see Bradley James on my screen again.

Season two of Turn has started and as much as I enjoyed the first season, I'm delighted to see they've fixed the problems that annoyed me before and made it 100% better. Ben is still his adorable, lovely self (and there was even a few scenes of him with his hair down!), Caleb remains flawless, and Abe, free of the dreadful Anna/Abe romance, has finally settled into a somewhat likeable character. I love the greater emphasis on spying, along with some 1700s gadgets, and the interaction between the spies, things that were all very lacking before. Andre's character growth is a treat, and I've learned to enjoy him, and feel deeply for him - his reaction after realizing he's lost Peggy made me tear up. The new character, Benedict Arnold and Peggy, especially, are interesting, and I love how the personal drama has taken a backseat to the war. I'm fascinated and heartbroken by Hewlett's journey from a dreamer to a broken fugitive, and surprised by how much I've grown to love and root for him.

When Calls the Heart has also begun season two, and as happy as I am to see Jack again, I'm a little disappointed by the many changes, especially the costume and hairstyle updates that give a strangely modern feel. I do like seeing more of Elizabeth and Jack's families, though, as well as the effect that the changes, including the new name, will have on the town. I loved DeWitt and Mary's wedding, but miss the other characters, and am sad by how much Elizabeth has changed and become less likeable. The new characters are a mixed bag as well: I despise Charles, and Elizabeth's other sister, am ambivalent toward Julie, enjoy Tom but only when he's with Jack - the brothers give me so many feels - and surprisingly adore Rosemary whose hilarious antics cheer me up. I'm also rooting for her love story, and I hope Abigail ends up with the pastor and ditches her current, dreadful love interest.

I've been keeping up with Olympus and it's promising so far, growing slowly into the type of mythological drama tv hasn't had in many years, a little cheesy, a little dark, and a lot of fun. I like the main character and the mystery regarding the curse on his name, as well as his relationship with the Oracle. I like it's different approach to the myths, as well as the riddle inside the mercenary.

While I'm far from a fan of Agents Of SHIELD, I've been keeping up with it in case there are tie-ins with the rest of MCU, and it's given me at least one treat in the form of Luke Mitchell. It's so lovely to see him again and his character, Lincoln, is great fun with his electric powers.

Officially the last person to do so, I've fallen in love with the short-lived series Firefly and it's brilliant, a perfect fusion of thrown together family, fantastic one-liners, and flawless blend of sci-fi spaceships and western music and gun-twirling. I adore the characters, especially Mal, Simon, and River, and all the relationships are heart-warming, especially Simon and River's.

I finally finished watching the complete series of Tour Of Duty and I'd forgotten how much I loved the show and how it handled complex issues, as well as how human it made it's characters. Anderson remains a sweetheart, Goldman never fails to make me cry - especially the episodes with his father, and Purcell breaks my heart time and again. But in watching the last two seasons for the first time I discovered an unexpected treat in Johnny McKay. He's the sort of character I seem to fall for instantly - cocky, brash, always smiling, and a heart of gold, and I knew I'd adore him the instant he blasted rock and roll out of the speakers of his chopper. He's a delight and has quickly become my favorite character.

The second season of Girl Meets World has started and it's brought with it even more old faces from Boy Meets World, the best of which is Eric. Eric was always my favorite and he's as hilarious and loveable as ever, and it make me so nostalgic and happy to see him again.

I'm working my way through season three of Teen Wolf and it's my favorite so far. The show has finally found it's feet with it's division of screentime between characters, and, as is the case with every supernatural show I enjoy, the more characters who know, the better the show is. Without having to waste time hiding the truth the characters get to work together and the plot flows so much better. I also love the bits of humor this season, and the writing has improved so much. Scott continues to be a sweetheart, Derek is still wonderful and makes me cry (I sobbed at his backstory episode), the adults are fabulous, and I'm learning to love Stiles. Also there's Kira, one of my favorite characters in the show, and after two and a half seasons of annoying Allison drama I love that Scott finally has a sweet, kind girlfriend. I'm also glad it's Allison's final season, but I'm sad it's also Isaac's, since I like him. Braeden is awesome, and I actually like Malia and find her backstory fascinating.

I've started watching the later seasons of ER and completely fallen in love with Luka. It's wonderful to see Goran Visnjic in something else, and I adore Luka's relationship with Abby, and watching as he slowly finds happiness. His backstory breaks my heart, and I sobbed my way through the stunning episode "The Lost", especially when he starts praying.

I've completely fallen in love with the soundtrack of La Légende du Roi Arthur, especially the gorgeous "Auprès d'un Autre" and it's music video.
 
 
calliope tune: "Do You Believe In Magic"-Lovin Spoonful
feeling: ditzy
 
 
 
Kathleen
I've been working my way through Tom Cruise's filmography, starting with Edge Of Tomorrow. I've always had a soft spot for time loops and the film was quite creative in making the repeated day different. Cage and Rita's relationship was poignant but touching, and I teared up during the scene where they share tea and he remembers exactly how much sugar she likes when she can't ever remember being there. I was definitely thankful for the happy ending. Next was Knight and Day, an adorable and hilarious spy romance. I adored Roy, and his growing relationship with June as they go from one adventure to the next was beautiful. The conclusion was flawless and heartwarming. Next was Minority Report which was amazing, both for a twisted, intricate plot, as well as fantastic world-building. The characters made me emotionally invested, though, especially Agatha and John, and I loved the concept of the story as well as the conclusion. In other new films I saw The Fault In Our Stars and despite my low expectations due to the popularity of it, I ended up bawling my eyes out. There were so many thought-provoking moments. It was beautiful and completely haunting, and I loved Augustus and Hazel's star crossed love story. The side characters, especially Isaac, were all interesting, and the final scene was poignant. After that was the 2005 version of King Kong. I remember watching the original years ago but not really being interested in it. This version, however, was fabulous, the perfect mix of tragedy, adventure, and romance. I loved that it retained the original 1930s setting and feel while enhancing the special effects. The island was breath-taking, both beautiful and dangerous with it's varied creatures and people and mysterious ruins. New York was also perfect, and I loved seeing both the old cars and the glimpses of early Hollywood. Jack was a lovely character, and I adored his and Ann's romance, and Jimmy was very sweet. I liked Hayes and was saddened when he was killed. Kong himself was excellent, both deadly and strangely sad and innocent, and I teared up at several scenes. After that was Lost In Austen which, despite starting out like a bad fanfic and being focused on my least favorite Austen tale, ended up being adorable and often hilarious. I adored Tom Mison as the very sweet Bingley, and Jane and his romance was perfect. Darcy was slightly more bearable than usual, and I loved the twist of Wickham being a good guy. The clever spins on the story were refreshing, and the ending was adorable. Next was Hocus Pocus, an adorable and often hilarious perfect Halloween movie. I loved Dani and Max's relationship, the dear Thackery, and the entertaining concept. The ending was beautifully poignant, too. Then was Dawn Of the Planet Of the Apes, the emotional sequel to the first film which I loved. While it took a bit to grow on me instead of the first which I loved instantly, it turned out to be amazing. Malcolm was every bit as much a hero and compelling character as Will, and Caesar, with his family, was wonderful and heartbreaking as before. I finally worked up my courage to finish the Batman trilogy, and, as expected, The Dark Knight was definitely not my favorite. The plot felt weak until the final moments, the hopelessness felt oppressive, and the Joker was a soulless, gruesome villain. However The Dark Knight Rises was a wonderful surprise. While I've always hated Catwoman and was less impressed than usual with this version, I adored the version of Robin - the twist of who he was made me gasp out loud - especially his taking over for Batman. Alfred, the best part of the trilogy, continually broke my heart, and Christian Bale was, as usual, superb as Bruce. The final twists, while bittersweet, were lovely and deeply satisfying, and I'm glad I gave it a chance. I stumbled across the short but powerful little film Cargo and completely fell in love with it. It's completely wordless, you know next to nothing about the characters, and yet it's incredibly powerful. The scene where he sees the balloon again completely broke my heart, and the ending left me wiping tears. Next was the imaginative and fun The Brothers Grimm followed by the adorable Tammy and the Bachelor.

In new fairytale adaptations I saw the lovely 2009 German version of Rapunzel, a gently old-fashioned sort of film with a largely endearing cast and simple but creative special effects. I loved the twist of Rapunzel's hair growing only when she brushes it, as well as her encountering the Prince as a child, and the metaphors of birds in cages was perfect. The side characters, especially the three princesses, were hilarious. After that was the 1992 version of Snow White, a sweet and highly unique adaptation. Snow was sweet, and finally young enough for the role, and I adored that the Prince had grown up beside her as the court jester, loved her from childhood, and searched faithfully for her. Their happy ending was wonderful, and the only time I've ever shipped the two characters. The dwarves were delightful, portrayed as clever and creators of all sorts of steampunk gadgets, and the evil Queen wasn't nearly as hammy as most versions. The story was beautifully, simply done, and I loved it. After that was the incredibly fun Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters. I have a soft spot for dark fantasy if done right, and the concept of showing what they became after the story ended was creative and flawless. I loved their relationship so much.

I saw the miniseries The Dove Keepers and while flawed and overly romantic, it was ultimately a moving and poignant imagining of the lives of those on Masada, a rare topic for a a film. It was also visually beautiful and I enjoyed it.

I've been watching the new show Intruders and it's strange to say the least. I find the premise, of people from older times seeking immortality by taking over bodies in the future, fascinating, and the acting, especially the frighteningly good Madison, is incredible, but the plot can be unsettling and frustratingly without answers to every question. I do, oddly enough, enjoy the slower pace, more reminiscent of old British tv, with the lingering, often beautiful cinematography. While I distrust most of the characters, I'm interested in Jack's fate - and incredibly impressed with John Simm's American accent - and I find Richard Shepherd an intriguing character, even if I've yet to figure out his motives. The series becomes increasingly more amazing as the pieces start to fall into place, though, and I'm growing to love it completely.

I've never been much of a zombie fan, but I gave a try to the new show Z Nation and ended up loving it. It's pure cheesy, low-budget fun to be sure, but the characters are easy to relate to and the writing never takes itself seriously. There's also the occasional, surprisingly poignant moment, such as the discovery of a baby that later turns. Mack and Addy are adorable together and I'm rooting for them both to survive. I also love Doc and the fabulous 10K with his sharp-shooting skills and bottomless cache of weapons. Garnett's death broke my heart, though, since he was the first character I bonded with on the series before I learned any of the others' names.

Also new is Forever and to my happiness it's a perfect blend of detective work, poignant moments, and dry humor, all brought to life by the very charming and lovely Ioan Gruffudd. Abe is wonderful, and I'm looking forward to seeing where Henry and Jo's relationship goes, as well as finding out the mysterious caller's identity.

I also found a similar, although short-lived series, New Amsterdam and fell in love with it's haunting, often heartbreaking story and main character. It's a beautifully filmed series, with the ever-changing New York almost a character in itself, and I adore how honest John is about the events of his life, even though no one ever believes him.

In other new shows there's the promising Scorpion. The characters are quirky and loveable with just a bit of sadness to tug on my heartstrings, and the premise is fun.

Also brand new is The Flash and while it hasn't quite grabbed me yet it has quite a bit of promise. Barry is slightly unconvincing as a superhero, but endearingly awkward and good-hearted, and the final twist of the pilot was intriguing enough to make me keep watching. I do appreciate the old-fashioned, more imaginative superhero approach the series is taking so far, unlike Arrow's un-sci-fi and often too serious for it's own good approach, even though it makes the crossover cameo of Barry meeting Oliver seem oddly out of character for both series. I love Barry and Iris together, but I also enjoy Eddie, and I'm hoping for a good resolution to the triangle.

In returning series, Reign is back and as usual burning through storylines a bit too fast for it's own good; as much as I enjoy each one I wish they'd slow down a bit and let the arc have more than one or two episodes. The plague, for example, which I was very much looking forward to, only really lasted a single episode with follow up for the next. With the love triangle out of the way and Bash and he back to being brothers I'm enjoying Francis much more, and despite my dislike of the baby storyline (and my crushed hope that they might kill off Lola) I'm loving seeing him being a father. Bash, Kenna aside, is wonderful, and I'm shocked they killed off Pascal considering I was assuming there would be a potential storyline regarding his past and Bash having killed his father. Saddest of all is what's become of Leith and Greer, with Leith having lost his lands as well as Greer completely it seems, and Lord Castleroy, such a sweet character last season, seems changed and harder since the death of his daughter.

Arrow has begun season three and so far it's something of a let down. Roy is fabulous as finally sane, a member of the team, and in full costume, but I desperately miss his relationship with Thea. Diggle being a daddy is adorable, and I'm looking forward to his storylines this season. Moira's absence is widely felt, with a lot of the stability of the show lacking. Laurel, as usual, gets the short end of the stick by having Sara die right off the bat. Poor Laurel, the writers must truly hate her based on all they put her through and shove her to the background. Felicity, much to my chagrin, has another large storyline this season, and seemingly out of nowhere the writers are shoving Oliver/Felicity in our faces, before having Oliver do his customary two steps backwards, distancing angst. I had such hopes that Oliver, after the moving away from violence he had last season, despite Stephen Amell's dubious acting ability, might actually get a moment this season that didn't involve romancing a girl or feeling sorry for himself. I just can't make myself like Felicity, as the fandom worships her, and she annoys me to distraction. But I lov seeing Brandon Routh on a superhero show, and even if his character isn't exactly the good guy, I grin ear to ear thinking of Superman and Green Arrow together again.

Once Upon A Time is now on season four, and as much as I dreaded it, I'm quite enjoying it. Anna is somewhat more likeable, and Elsa slightly less annoying in live-action form, and Kristoff is sweet. Perhaps best, though, is, with more time spent on those characters, the regulars finally seem to get a more equal cut of the time left over. Snow is adorable with baby Neal, and I finally enjoy the Charming family again. I couldn't help laughing through her meltdown over trying to fix the electricity. Killian is as usual fabulous, and I love his friendship with Charming. I'm even not minding Emma nearly as much as usual this season, and even though I don't ship it, being with Killian seems to soften her in ways her other romances never have, which is a good thing. Much to my delight, the Knave is back as wonderfully sassy as ever. Robin's storyline is disappointing so far, because even though I don't ship him with Regina, I liked seeing Regina good for a change and it made sense with his wife dead, whereas now with here alive, and instantly frozen and cast aside, it just makes him seem less than honorable. Roland remains precious, though, and so much bigger than last season! Bo Peep was a wonderful twist, and even though I prefer they use only fairytale characters, I can't remember the last time I've enjoyed a one shot character on the show so much. "The Apprentice", despite being Emma-centric, was a surprise delight and excellent take on The Sorcerer's Apprentice, right down to the music, the mouse, the awesome hat, and, best of all, the walking broom. As sad as I am to see Rumplestiltskin lying to Belle, I understand why he wants to be free of the dagger after all he suffered, and I'm intrigued to see where his quest takes him as long as he remains with Belle. Killian with two hands was awesome, but definitely creepy, and I suppose I'm glad he's back to the hook, even being under Rumplestiltskin's thumb for now. Henry is the only disappointment of the episode; no matter how much I long for him to have a relationship with Rumplestiltskin, it saddens me how he finally works in the shop only to spy on him. Henry has grown up a lot and he's becoming every bit as conniving as Regina. Belle finally gets center stage in "Family Business", and it's a treat to see the events that led up to her agreeing to go with Rumplestiltskin, as well as a bit of her life before that episode. Her scenes with Rumplestiltskin were heartbreaking when she reveals her secret believing he had known of his own, and before when she tries to control him with the dagger. The following episode was a surprise delight, by having Gerda as the Queen's sister, as well as Anna and Elsa's mother. The twist that the Snow Queen accidentally killed her other sister was incredibly sad, as was Gerda's choices, but the story was one of the most impressive all season. I'm saddened by Snow White's out of character response to Emma's magic, though, and her doting on baby Neal to the exclusion of her daughter, but Killian remains faithful and wonderful as always, the only one who doesn't seem afraid of Emma's powers. I liked seeing Cinderella and her son again, however briefly, even if it seems the baby should be much older than he is, leading me to wonder if time moves slower in Storybrooke. "Smash the Mirror" puts the final pieces on the mysterious fate of Anna and Kristoff, as well as how Elsa came to be trapped. I'm worried for Killian, with his heart now in Rumplestiltskin's control, and Rumplestiltskin continues to sadden me as he grows more and more into the Dark One he used to be. "Fall" is superb, with the spell of Shattered Sight one of the most intriguing so far, and I love each character's reaction, even as my heart breaks for Killian. "Shattered Sight" was flawless, a perfect episode in every way. I loved the mix of humor and sadness, the woven backstory, and the revelation of what was in the bottle. Ingrid was one of the most tragic bad characters the show has had and her ending was fittingly beautiful, giving her a sort of redemption. "Heroes and Villains" was superb, neatly resolving the storylines. I loved Killian getting his heart back by Belle's help, and Rumplestiltskin and Belle's flashbacks scenes were beautiful. The part where she drives him over the top line shattered my heart, but I loved seeing him in New York and I'm looking forward to where the event will take him.

Sleepy Hollow is back with season two much to my delight, and every bit as good as ever. The alternative history, with Ben Franklin's kite-flying key transformed into the way to unlock purgatory, and the Hellfire Club being highlights,continues to be a treasure, as does Ichabod's always hilarious attempts at understanding the 21st century. Ichabod and Abbie continue to be fabulous together. Caroline was a lovely one-shot character, and I was saddened that her character was killed off so quickly. The Headless Horseman is proving to be oddly sympathetic this season, and I'm intrigued to see the direction his character takes. Jeremy, still retaining the Sin Eating aspects of Henry, continues to be a disturbing, dangerous character, now fully a servant of Moloch. Irving, very much an ally last season, seems different this one, and the twist of him accidentally selling his soul doesn't bode well for which side he'll end up on in the end. Katrina, in episode four, finally gets some much needed depth. I'm not sure if the writers can't decide what to do with her or just can't seem to bring it across in the writing, but the "powerful witch" aspect is little more than a few charms and letters passed by birds, and her love for Ichabod seems strangely swayed by her caring for the Horseman, despite her claims to stay only to be a spy. Added to that is the fact that the writers keep making her a damsel in distress, weakening her, and then giving her the dubious trope of having to give birth to a demon. Still the glimpses of her character darkening show some promise, as much as I keep hoping she'll turn evil and interesting. But sadly she continues to be largely useless, unable to even destroy the demon child. New this season is Nick Hawley, and while I haven't yet sorted out his motivations he seems good enough so far, as well as fulfilling an intriguing role as a collector of odd supernatural items. I enjoy his quips toward Ichabod, and the nicknames he gives him, and his personality is a fun contrast to the other characters. The first two episodes scramble a bit to find their footing but the plot picks up directly after that, with the characters of the Piper and the Weeping Lady among the most intriguing monsters of the week. "Mama" is a beautifully sad episode, showcasing Abbie and Jenny's childhood. With minimal Katrina, "Magnum Opus" is a delight, featuring a mythical sword and Ichabod and Abbie up against a Gorgon, along with a few glimpses of Ichabod and Abraham's early days.

Brand new this season is Constantine and it's fabulous, with enough supernatural snark to make me happy and enough of an underlying angst to break my heart. John is a mix of the two and I already adore him, as well as the concept of the series. Chas is wonderful and deserves far more screentime, and Corrigan is fascinating, leaving me hoping to see more of him. Zed is also excellent so far, and I enjoy her relationship with Constantine; the writers definitely made the correct choice in replacing the first character with her.

I've been working my way through the one season of Emily Owens M.D. and it's a treat, both hilarious and quite poignant. I relate so much to Emily's awkwardness and inner thoughts, and Justin Hartley is adorable as Will. I can't help shipping them. Cassandra is fabulously evil with some surprisingly human moments, but I loathe Micah and his crush on Emily makes me cringe. The patients are always fascinating, though, and I usually become emotionally invested in each one, even knowing they're only going to be in the one episode.

Somehow having missed the short-lived Intelligence earlier this year, I'm watching the complete series now and loving it, mostly for the amazing relationship between the two main characters. They were instantly shipable with wonderful banter, and I love seeing their friendship growing into the start of something more as the episodes progress. I also really love the concept of the series, and the constant reminders that despite having a chip is his brain, Gabriel is still very human, made even more beautiful by the fact that Riley believes that from the start.

I watched a bit of Hercules: the Legendary Journeys and while it lacks some of Young Hercules's charm, it was still fun to see older versions of the characters. My favorite parts, though, were the flashbacks to the younger versions with Iolaus and Jason as wonderful as always. Ian Bohen is awesome at the role, even as much as I adore Ryan Gosling's version, and I loved seeing more of him. I also saw the excellent episode "Prodigal Sister" and loved it. Ruun was a fascinating character, and I adored how his disability wasn't shown as much of a handicap, what with his fighting skills and other heightened senses. I loved the clever twist of making everyone think his sister was actually the girl who died instead of the main Amazon warrior, and the concept of the matching marks on their hands was lovely. The ending was logical and hopefully beautiful, too. Throughout the series, though, Iolaus is a complete treasure, both heartbreakingly sweet and sad at once, and I adore his friendship with Hercules.

I've been returning top my childhood and loving the old variety/music shows I watched growing up, including my forever favorite Lawrence Welk Show, and also Hollywood Palace, American Bandstand, Your Hit Parade, and What's My Line which is always entertaining.

I've been working way through the sweet western The Travels Of Jaimie McPheeters and enjoying it, especially Charles Bronson's character. I've also having great fun watching The Many Loves Of Dobie Gillis, Bachelor Father, Mork and Mindy, Gilligan's Island, and Father Knows Best. And I've picked up All Creatures Great and Small and it's lovely, the creative Sliders, the exciting Baa Baa Black Sheep, the superb The Prisoner, Adam Adamant Lives! and its fabulous theme, the quirky Due South, and the fun MacGyver and CHiPs. I've also returned to a childhood obsession, the short-lived but fantastic The Highwayman. Then I've actually found a soap opera I enjoy in Dallas. I've also had a burst of nostalgia for my baby obsessions Mister Roger's Neighborhood and Reading Rainbow.

I've started watching Game of Thrones and while its not entirely to my taste I do enjoy the world-building and the Stark family, especially the wonderful Jon Snow.

Partway into the new series of Doctor Who and I've finally gotten a good enough grasp of its feel to write about it. Despite my distrust of Moffat and the fact that I'm not a huge fan of Peter Capaldi, I had high hopes going into the new series, with the positives being an older Doctor portrayed by an actor who was a fan of the original series. Unfortunately, a few episodes in and I'm ready to give up. The writing, largely dominated by Moffat, remains shaky at best, riddled with plot holes, retconning, and copious amounts of technobabble. The human element and warmth that gave the original episodes so much appeal is almost sucked dry, replaced by an ever-present and entirely non amusing stream of tactless jokes. The characterization is even worse, as Clara is constantly insulted, treated like a child, mocked for her appearance, ordered about, and even outright kidnapped by the Doctor who she incomprehensibly still wants to save, and her messing with the Doctor's timeline continues to be increasingly annoying. Clara herself makes thoughtless comments regarding Danny's PTSD, and Danny radiates a unsettling hostility. Two episodes in and Danny still has zero personality outside of having been a soldier, and Clara has virtually no life outside of the Doctor despite a few random glimpses of her being a teacher. Danny and Clara's relationship feels forced and unrealistic, but still dashing my hopes for a romance-free season. The only time she has any real character development is in "Kill the Moon" when she finally stands up to the Doctor and his bumbling, but the flare of hope is quickly put out when Danny's horrible advice sends her running back to the Doctor's arms like a victim with Stockholm Syndrome. Worst of all is Twelve: inexplicably dark yet created as a Doctor who had saved his home planet, the source of Nine's darkness and Ten's angst, not to mention impossibly rude, childish, and worst of all frightening. I've seen all the Doctors, and even at their darkest, not a single Doctor has ever made me unnerved or uncomfortable until now. There's nothing to trust or want to help in Twelve, and he seems more mad serial killer than beneficial savior of humanity. As if slapping past Doctors in the face, he comments that earth isn't "his world" and humans aren't "his people", making me yearn for the Doctors like Ten who loved humanity a little too much. He no longer seems to care about anyone, and simply stands by while people are hurt or killed. Moffat seems to have forgotten that at the Doctor's core there's supposed to be a goodness, something to bond with beyond the non human body, and that his two hearts are supposed to indicate he cares more not less. In other words, the Doctor has never seemed more alien. Perhaps worst of all, as Moffat said in an interview, Clara has inexplicably become the main character of the show, with chunks of plot wasted on her romance and daily life, while the Doctor is reduced to a childish, senile old man whose bumbling attempts to comprehend "boring" people and save the world seem laughable and pointless as Clara and Danny direct his every move. The flawed "Robot Of Sherwood"'s plot and sword fighting feels like a flashback to Classic Who, complete with a cheesy but loveable Robin, and an adorable reunion between Robin and Marion. Still the bickering and rivalry between the Doctor and Robin spoils the mood, and the Doctor's strange disbelief at Robin being real as well as the line about "history being a burden" only proves how out of character and worn the character and show is becoming. However the season has a silver lining in the frustratingly almost perfect "Flatline" whose intriguing, fresh storyline, unique aliens, and endearingly cheesy special effects serve to remind me of when the show was consistently this good. Twelve is finally something like the Doctor should be, caring about people, defending the earth and declaring himself the protector of it, and being proud of Clara, even if he somewhat ruins it by a cryptic, annoying comment at the end and refusing to admit what he said to her face. Clara, despite being a bit overbearing at times, seems more clever than usual, and her act of restoring the TARDIS through a fake picture was nothing short of brilliant. I liked the guest character with her as well. The season's two part finale is perhaps the most problematic yet, with Clara willing to hold the TARDIS hostage and destroy the keys, essentially stranding the Doctor, in order to save Danny who, much like his story arc, has been pointlessly killed off. Everything is wrong with this, as, even the most callous Doctors have risked everything to help their companions, and Clara, besides betraying whatever friendship she held with Eleven, is being a selfish, thoughtless child, knowing that past and hopefully future Doctors have saved so many lives and worlds that she'd now let that all stop just to save one person. Nothing about Danny and Clara's lie-filled, manipulative love story has seemed genuine, and even the revelation of the source of Danny's anger and guilt issues can make me feel anything for him. Twelve, as usual, is out of character for the Doctor, unable to recognize tears or grief, and seemingly unaware of male/female relationships, but it's the humor where the episode fails the most. Missy forcing a kiss on Twelve is neither amusing or comfortable to watch, bordering on assault. Missy herself is a complete affront to the series, as if a female Master wasn't bad enough, her deranged, obsessive love for Twelve is disturbing, Worst of all is the callous, insensitivity, even dark humor, toward cremation, forms of burial, death, beliefs in the afterlife, and more, crossing a line that nothing should.

On a happier note I've discovered Torchwood and it's everything I've missed from Doctor Who and every bit as good as it used to be. I'm enjoying the new characters as well as loving Jack as usual, and the feel of the show gives me so much nostalgia.
 
 
calliope tune: "Lightnin' Strikes"-Lou Christie
feeling: impressed
 
 
Kathleen
26 March 2014 @ 12:10 pm
I just got back from seeing Captain America: The Winter Soldier and it was brilliant, a perfect meshing of spy games and history which catered to every one of my favorite things. The technology was more amazing than ever with the holograms, the face change, the "living" computer, and the spooky ways of Hydra. Steve, happily, was his usual noble, good self, and my heart broke for him as he struggles to come to terms with the current world, his disillusionment with SHIELD, the betrayals all around him,and the loss of Bucky. I loved the subtle touches to his character: the 40s music on record in his apartment, the fact that he carries Peggy's picture, and more, and his gymnastics and shield-flinging were even more awesome than in earlier films. I sobbed when he visits the now elderly Peggy and she finally recognizes him. Natasha was wonderful, a flawless contrast and comparison to Steve and I loved their friendship and her constant match-making. I grew to love Sam almost instantly, both for his kind heart as well as his fantastic suit and wings, and I love that Steve now has a friend and ally. The curly-haired Shield agent was also wonderful; I wish he'd had a larger part because I loved how heroic and ordinary he was. Bucky destroyed me. I loved him in the first film and seeing what became of him, and how mutely accepting he was of the cruelty from the people who brainwashed him hurt horribly. Steve and his fight was brutal but showed the best of them - Steve going down, even badly wounded to unpin Bucky from the beam, and the poignant moment when Bucky dragged Steve out of the lake. I adored the final sequence of him seeing his old photo, giving me some glimmer of hope for his future.

I went to see X Men: Days Of Future Past in theatres and it was flawless, exceeding all of my hopes and expectations. Quicksilver was wonderful, hilarious and perfect in every way, and I loved the new characters, especially Warpath. Charles completely broke my heart, as did his lost friendship with Magneto. I loved seeing Magneto waver between hero and bad guy, and seeing Mystique get a second chance. The time travel was done surprisingly well, with the past and present aligned in a poignant, non-intrusive way. The ending made me tear up, especially seeing Scott alive again, and I was so happy that everything was fixed and made hopeful from the darkness of the prior films.

I also saw Maleficent in theatres and it was gorgeous, a lovely reimagining of the fairytale. I was surprised to find how much I could sympathize with and like Maleficent, both as a hero and as a bad character, and I adored her slow-growing love and caring as she watches over little Aurora. Calling her "beastie" was precious, too. Aurora was a darling, and Elle Fanning did a perfect job portraying her sweetness and innocence. Phillip, too, was quite adorable despite his small role, and I loved the hopeful ending for both of them. The Moor creatures were fabulous, all very imaginative and beautiful. I loved Diaval who infused both humor and sympathy into the role, and I ended up shipping him with Maleficent by the ending which was flawless as both of them flew off together.

I finally got to see The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug and, while still nothing compared to Lord Of The Rings it seems to have found it's footing after the last film, thankfully dropping the annoying comedy and weak characterizations in favor of solid drama and a broader focus. Kili remains the brightest spot, a sweet and brave little dwarf I can't help adoring, and his crush on Tauriel was precious and bittersweet. Despite my reservations at adding a new character, Tauriel proved to be quite fascinating, both for her care for Kili, as well as her backstory with Legolas. Legolas was fabulous, using his super-human fighting skills to full advantage. I loved the subtle moment where he's injured in battle - probably for the first time in his long life - and stares at the blood on his fingers. Bard and his family were lovely, showing the heroism and life of the humans in Middle Earth, and I enjoyed the brief bit of the skinwalker. The threads to LOTRs were better connected this time, too, with the ring's evil grip already starting to show, and the Necromancer being Sauron amassing his army of orcs. Sadly, Thorin, the heroic and admirable king of the first film, has changed completely, with poor explanation for the sudden change, and the respect he had for Bilbo in the first film is completely lost, as is most of his caring for his company.

I'm working my way through the '90s show Young Hercules and it's flawless, with hilarious moments, a wonderful friendship trio, and old effects against a mythological background. Hercules, despite looking nothing like how I imagine - more muscles would be nice - is growing on me, and Iolaus is adorable; I'm completely in love with his hair and sass.

I've started watching the fascinating new series Dominion, and I love the plot and world so far. The wings are impressive, Michael is an intriguing character, and I adore Alex and Bixby's relationship.

I'm onto the second half of season three of Once Upon A Time with "New York City Serenade", an episode that focuses entirely too much on Emma but manages to redeem itself by the seemingly unintentionally hilarious plotpoint of having her dating a flying monkey. But Killian is fabulous as usual; I giggled like mad at the "bologna" comment, and Belle and Robin's reunion scene and hug was so beautiful. I was a little sad that Storybrooke came back so quickly, though, since, although I knew eventually the writers would bring it back, I was hoping for more time than just flashbacks in the Enchanted Forest, since it and the Land Without Color are my favorite locations in the series. "Witch Hunt", despite my continuing annoyance by the writers making Regina so utterly dependent upon Henry for happiness, was an excellent episode, recapturing much of the first season feel that's been lacking. Dr. Whale is back and I'm thrilled to see both him and Storybrooke's hospital again. Robin Hood and his men have made it to modern Storybrooke, and, at least in the past, he and Regina have bonded, a pairing I find surprisingly appealing despite my early reservations. Little Roland is as adorable as ever, and Regina is quite cute with him. Henry, unsurprisingly, is even more of a pain without his memories and optimism to give him some appeal, but Snow White reading about baby care was hilariously adorable. I'm not the least bit shocked by the revelation that the Wicked Witch is Regina's half sister, even if I rolled my eyes at the writers's fondness for making everyone related or married to everyone else. Happiest of all, Rumplestiltskin is alive, although held prisoner by the Witch and acting like the crazy past version of himself which worries me. But still I couldn't stop smiling the instant I heard his voice. "The Tower" was frustrating and largely disappointing, seeming like a feeble excuse to cast Charming as the Cowardly Lion. Rapunzel was pretty and sweet but horribly underused, serving little purpose but to encourage Charming to face his fear, and not even getting a proper story or prince of her own. Likewise the creepy ghost witch was much of a letdown. On the bright side Rumplestiltskin continues to make my heart hurt, with Robert Carlyle bringing the much needed acting talented to the series even in such a limited role. "Quiet Minds", the best episode so far, was a fascinating step forward in the series as much is revealed and explained. Belle finally got center stage and a chance to shine in the flashbacks as she attempts to bring back Rumplestiltskin. I loved that, realizing the price and what the Witch wanted, she was willing to let things stand as they were and not bring him back. Lumiere was a treat; I'd love to see more of him and the tale of his past, and I enjoyed seeing Belle's library again, as well as the moment that Rumplestiltskin comes back to life and sees Belle. Finally Rumplestiltskin's madness is explained as it's revealed that he took Bae into his own mind and body to save his life. As much as I've always disliked Bae due to his selfishness and unwillingness to forgive Rumplestiltskin - after all the only reason he even wants to bring him back is to get to Emma, and not because he loves him unlike Belle - he was much better than usual in the episode. I enjoyed the closure to Killian and his story, and their hug was poignant. His death hurt, more so for Rumplestiltskin who has finally and truly lost his son, than for Bae himself, since it makes sense to write him out by now. Robert Carlyle broke my heart as usual as he's forced back to his cage by the Witch, looking worn and helpless and broken. On the brighter side, Regina finally learned Robin Hood's identity as her perfect match, and I loved seeing little Roland again, even briefly, as Robin played with him. "It's Not Easy Being Green" finally shows Oz, and I adored the way the wizard was shown, as well as the slippers being silver, even if I was a little disappointed by the fake look of the Emerald City. Rumplestiltskin broke my heart again as we see the extent of Zelena's hold over him, and his fear of hurting Belle. I was thrilled he and Belle shared at least one scene together, and when he reaches for her hand I couldn't help tearing up. Also his face as he felt Bae's funeral was poignant. Despite my dislike for Henry, I loved seeing Killian teaching him and spending time with him, mostly for the wistfulness on Killian's face as he remembers Bae. I've always adored Killian-centric episodes and "The Jolly Roger" is a treat, even if slightly marred by the appearance of poorly cast Ariel and Eric, the most underused and pointless inclusion of fairytale characters in the series. I loved seeing the series take on Blackbeard, especially with Killian getting to battle him, and Killian's guilt over his choice shows even more how much he's changed, even if him being cursed seems overly cruel. "Bleeding Through" is the misery of a Cora episode, and even an intriguing ghostly encounter and the final mending of Regina and Snow's relationship did little to make it bearable. Roland was precious as ever, though - I love his little hat. But the ever-twisting family tree has reached disturbing heights now as it's revealed Cora was originally engaged to Snow's father/Regina's husband. Still I was grateful Zelena wasn't Rumplestiltskin's daughter as I'd feared. "A Curious Thing" was a weaker episode, with far too many loose threads tied up much too quickly. I can't say I'm happy with Henry getting his memories back, since he was more out of the way and bearable without them, but I'm glad Killian came clean about the curse, even if it caused everyone to turn on him. The Charmings, once enjoyable, have become insufferable, and Snow willingly crushing Charming's heart just to get to Emma only sealed my disgust. The heart shared between them was annoyingly trite, and I'm tired of the baby drama. The one bright spot was Rumplestiltskin and Belle's brief interaction and the fabulous scene that revealed Killian was telling the truth as Bae splits himself from his father just long enough to send him the memory potion. "Kansas" felt a bit rushed and packed but was overall quite good and their Dorothy was thankfully quite cute and non-annoying, even if, as usual, the actress was too old for the part. It was quite epic to see everyone united around protecting the baby - who turned out to be adorable and I was so happy that my guess of it being a boy was correct - even if I couldn't stop laughing at Dr. Whale's dramatic faint. It was wonderful to see him again, though. Charming was precious with the baby. As much as I dislike Emma I was thrilled that she gave up her magic to save Killian; and his heartbroken smile and eyes completely destroyed me. I teared up when Rumplestiltskin, finally free, asked Belle to marry him, even if I'm a little sad that he lied to her about the dagger. Still I'm grateful to see Zelena gone after all she'd done. The season's finale "Snow Drifts"/"There's No Place Like Home" was happily quite good for a Emma-centric episode. I loved the playing with history and the way the book became rewritten. Rumplestiltskin was hilarious and very much his old self, and I loved his interactions with Belle and Killian. Except for Rumplestiltskin's reaction I didn't like that the Charmings named their baby Neal since it seemed strange and a little awkward. Rumplestiltskin and Belle's long-awaited wedding was beautiful, with their vows deeply moving; I couldn't hold back the tears to see them together at all. Little Roland and his ice cream was precious. I loved seeing Marion return and be reunited with Robin and Roland, but was disappointed by Elsa being next season's villain.

Onto season seven of Rawhide now and much to my delight Pete is back in the second half. While there's little to no meaning to his random reappearance I'm so happy to see that familiar checked shirt again and hear that beautiful accent, even if only for a few episodes. Rowdy has grown up so much, even from last season, and I miss the awkward, gentle cowhand, even if he's still twice the trail boss Gil is in the episodes where he takes over. Still flashes of his old personality shine through when he's teasing Wishbone or romancing a girl, and it's as lovely as always.

I gave a try to Girl Meets World, the second generation spin-off from Boy Meets World and it was a mix of the cringe-worthy modern and the warmly nostalgic. It was wonderful seeing Cory and Topanga again, grown up and parents themselves, and even Mr. Feeny if only for a moment. The sets reminded me so much of the orginal series. Auggie is quite cute so far, and Farkle is amusing. The kids channel their parents to the extent that I'm torn between being impressed at how well they're pulling off the mannerisms of the original actors to being frustrated that the writers didn't just create all new characters since not every child is a copycat of their parents.

I'm working my way through season one of Sugarfoot now that it's finally on DVD, and it's a treat. Tom is an endearing character, one of the sweetest in westerns, and I love the contrasts of his character - the gentle boy who seems to know nothing about the west and yet has such keen insight, as well as the man who doesn't believe in guns and yet is a superb shot. He's also one of the characters who make my heart hurt when he's forced to kill someone, since it seems such a horrible contrast to his sunny personality. One of my favorite things is all the WB westerns take place in the same universe so there's always crossover potential - Bronco and Sugarfoot teamed up was always my favorite - and in this case there was a hilarious and adorable cameo by Bret Maverick at the end of an episode.

There's also some new episodes of 77 Sunset Strip and Surfside 6 up and I'm falling in love with both series all over again. I adore Van Williams's accent, and just seeing Rex again puts a smile on my face.

I finally managed to view an episode of the Civil War era series The Americans and it was quite good, presenting a refreshingly unbiased view of the war with corrupt Northern soldiers and an honorable Confederate. Robert Culp, always at his best when playing the emotionally tortured, wounded character, was superb as a soldier panged by conscience.

I also got to see some of the sadly short-lived but wonderful The Phoenix. Bennu was a lovely and sweet character, completely stealing my heart in his interactions with children and animals, and the actor was incredibly convincing as the gentle alien.

I've been casually watching the new version of The Tomorrow People and while I haven't exactly bonded with it I do completely adore John who makes my heart ache with every sad look and the way he tries to get himself hurt to atone for the past.

I've started watching the new series Believe and it's beautiful and touching and nothing like any other show currently on which makes me adore it. Despite the prickly edges I like Tate, and Bo is intriguing, as is the mystery of her gifts and why people want to kill her. I loved the twists and turns in the plot, especially the Senga bit, as well as Bo's bringing hope to everyone she meets. The plot was a perfect blend of humor and sadness, and there's been very few pilots I've loved so much.

Resurrection is new and incredibly fascinating so far taking a nearly disturbing premise and managing to craft an often deeply touching series. I have so many questions and theories but for now I'm just enjoying the beauty of the show, it's music, and the potential.

There's also The 100 which seems promising so far. I adore Finn and his acrobatics and '80s hair, and he and Clarke seem potentially cute together. "Earth Skills" continues to world build, revealing only a glimpse of the Grounders. Jasper is, happily, alive and rescued, and Finn continues to be sweet and wonderful, protecting Clarke from having her bracelet removed, and ensuring she has food. Octavia is fascinating so far, and I loved the scene of her with the glowing butterflies. I adored that Clarke's mother figured out what was happening with the kids on earth, and has bought a little more time for everyone.

I've started watching Turn and it's amazing so far. I'd never even dreamed of getting a Revolutionary War series and I'm beyond happy with how it's set up, with the spy intrigue and appealing characters, beautiful scenery and a talented cast.

I'm also watching Salem which veers between the disturbingly strange and utterly fascinating fast enough to give me whiplash. John Alden is an intriguing character, and despite my reservations about using the Salem Witch Trials as the setting for a show abut real witches its all handled in a creepy, quite interesting manner.

I discovered the hilarious '90s short-lived series You Wish and completely fell in love with it. I have a soft spot for genies, and this one is sweet and completely random. I love the premise and characters and the events never fail to make me laugh.

I'm working my way through the adorable The Second Hundred Years and Monte Markham is a completely underrated gift, both hilarious and heartwarming as Luke. He even, to my delight, got to sing in a few episodes.

In new films I saw the intriguing I Am Number Four, and adored the premise as well as how it was portrayed. John/Four was a likeable protagonist, and I liked his romance with Sarah and friendship with Sam who was endearing. His gifts, especially the light-up hands were fabulous. I was saddened that Henri died, since I loved John and his relationship, but glad Bernie survived, even if the ending left so much open for a sequel. Next was the 1998 version of The Man In The Iron Mask, always my favorite of the Three Musketeers series, and it was the best adaptation I've seen yet, despite a slow start. Leonardo DiCaprio was wonderful at the dual role, and I adored and ached for Philippe. The scene where they put him back in the mask hurt, but I loved that he didn't let it destroy him and clung to the hope that the others would rescue him. Also, on a shallow note c.1998 Leonardo DiCaprio was absurdly beautiful. I loved the ending especially. After that was the beautiful and poignant Copperhead. I adored the focus on the Civil War homefront and little known elements of history, as well as the amazing detail to authenticity, and gorgeous, old-fashioned filming, acting, scenery, and music. Next was The Redemption Of Henry Myers, a surprisingly good and heart-warming western with easy to love characters and an unexpected happy ending. Then was the stunning World War Z which I adored, despite it making me jump multiple times. Brad Pitt was superb as Gerry, and I loved his devotion to his family, and friendship with Segen. After that was the lovely April Love, a gorgeously 1950s period drama. Pat Boone was wonderful, the storyline was sweet, and I adored the scenery, especially the country fair, and the music. Next was Prom. I watched it mainly for the cast but it won me over in moments with it's sweetness. Thomas McDonell was absolutely lovely as Jesse - I have even more appreciation for his hair now - and I loved how my first impressions of him were wrong. His scenes with his little brother were very cute, and I loved that Nova learned to see through the bad boy shell to his gentle heart. Next was the poignant but beautifully filmed Pompeii. I loved the characters and wished there had been more before the disaster, and the ending was haunting and deeply moving. Next was the strangely good Interview With the Vampire. The plot was unusually poignant, and I couldn't help but feel sympathy for the characters: tormented Louis, monster child Claudia, and even Lestat to see what he became, shrinking from Louis beneath the graveyard. The ending was a little strange, but I loved the feel of the film, the music, and the passage of time with the characters. After loving the classic radio drama for years I finally got to see the film version of The Night Has A Thousand Eyes and it was lovely and moody, a perfect and haunting story. I finally watched the 1997 Titanic and while it could never compare to my beloved 1996 miniseries, I enjoyed quite a bit of the film. The more modern feel was a little off-putting, but I adored Jack's free spirit and devotion to Rose, giving everything, and ultimately his life to ensure her survival and happiness. Leonardo DiCaprio was, as usual, painfully beautiful and perfectly cast. There was the unexpected treat of a very excellent, although minor, performance by Ioan Gruffudd, too, and the ship itself was gorgeous. Next was Push, a surprisingly good superhero film with a twisting plot. I loved the characters, especially Nick and Cassie, and the fabulous world-building. After that was the heartbreaking and touching Flowers In The Attic, the more modern version. Chris and Cathy's relationship was beautiful, as was their caring for the little twins, and Cory's death as well as the children's loss of innocence was wrenchingly painful. I loved that the husband let them go at the end, and the sense of hope that they'd make it on their own. Next was the hauntingly poignant Rabbit Proof Fence. I find the Stolen Generations a fascinating and tragic part of history, and the film told a true story in a moving, almost documentary style with stunning acting, especially from the children.

I finally found more Mary Pickford films I hadn't yet seen, and I started with some versions of books/films I love. The first was A Little Princess, a unique version, and while not my favorite by any means - that will forever be the brilliant 1986 version - I enjoyed some moments very much such as Sara's stories coming to life, and the vision of her parents at the end. Next was the gorgeous Pollyanna which ended up tying my beloved 1960 Disney as my favorite version. Mary Pickford was adorable as Pollyanna, and while the story was short it rarely felt rushed. Jimmy was wonderful, and I was happily surprised to find him closer to Pollyanna's age, a romantic interest for her, and the cute glimpse of their future and many children together. Aunt Polly was quite good, as was Nancy, despite having a smaller part, and I loved how faithful to the book it was. it's now tied with Amarilly Of Clothes-Line Alley as my favorite Mary Pickford film, and ahead of my second favorite My Best Girl.

In new animated films I watched the adorable and clever Monsters Inc. and Monsters University. I loved the characters, especially Sulley with little Boo, and the hilarious moments. In theatres I saw How To Train Your Dragon 2 and while it felt somewhat crammed and overwhelming it was a lovely step forward in the world-building with some very funny and extremely touching moments. I loved seeing the kids growing up but still retaining what made them loveable. Hiccup and Astrid were sweet together, and Snotlout and Fishlegs fighting over Ruffnut kept me giggling. I adored Ruffnut's crush on Eret who was a fabulous new addition, growing on me throughout the movie, especially when Stormfly saved him and he freed her in return. Hiccup and Toothless's relationship was beautiful, and I loved how Hiccup won him back and forgave him. Despite the oddity of her backstory I liked Hiccup's mother and only wish there'd been more sweet family scenes before Stoic's death. I hadn't expected that and even though he wasn't one of my favorite characters I was saddened to have him die, even more so that Toothless was the one who caused it, even without meaning to, and I wish the writers hadn't gone that route. The scenery and animation was as detailed and gorgeous as always, the dragons were all unique and amazing, and I loved the recap of the games at the ending and Hiccup becoming the new chief.
 
 
feeling: listless
calliope tune: "26 Miles"-Four Preps
 
 
Kathleen
I'm on the eighth and final season of Rawhide and as expected so much has changed. The intro is odd, and I miss the "head 'em up, move 'em out" endings, but the plots are as good as ever. Rowdy is finally trail boss with Gil gone, and despite my reservations and his somewhat less carefree, more "grown up" personality, I'm adoring both the change and the chance to see Rowdy finally step into the role properly. Unlike Gil's hostile, often cruel attitude, Rowdy makes for a warmer, kinder boss who, unlike Gil, values the men more than the herd, and the entire feel of the series as well as the trail boss to drovers relationship seems more relaxed without Gil's abrasiveness. His selflessness is obvious throughout the season, with countless contrasts to Gil, especially when he lets another drover, falsely accused of murder, escape, and gets himself arrested in his place to investigate the brutality of the lawman. Also, while he puts the herd before himself, he's instantly willing to risk the herd and time for the men, something Gil would never have considered. Of the original cast only Wishbone and Jim Quince, now serving as ramrod, remain, and despite my happiness in still having them I miss the others, especially Mushy, terribly. The always solid John Ireland steps in as drover Jed Colby, and the sweet, British-accented greenhorn Ian stole my heart from his intro. I love Rowdy's protectiveness of him unlike the more equal relationship he shares with the others. Simon Blake fills the position of trusted drover and he's fabulous, fitting perfectly with the cast and having a simple yet lovely friendship with Rowdy and the other men.

Outlander has just started and it's gorgeous so far with a flawless intro/theme and the very beautiful Jamie Fraser whose face keeps looking like a young Jamie Bamber so much i just want to cuddle and protect him from harm. I finally have all the kilts and Scottish accents my heart could desire. The show continues to get better with twists and turns, gorgeous scenery, including an ancient castle, a beautifully interwoven fairytales, and Jamie's sweetness. I can't say how many years I've longed to hear "Dinna fash" come out of a tv character's mouth. Dougal bothers me, though, between his treatment of Claire and his eyes on his brother's position, even at the cost of killing Jamie. Geillis annoys me dreadfully, and I'm completely convinced she's going to turn evil, if she isn't already. I do adore Mrs. Fitz, though, and the Laird, despite my first impressions, is proving to be intriguing character.

Way late but I've just discovered the fabulous Hell On Wheels and I'm rolling in the gorgeous intro, authenticity, classic western feel, and excellent writing. It's a real treat, and I already love Bohannon, Naomi, and their little baby. Doc and Eva's relationship is sad and touching, and I quite like Psalms.

I've been enjoying Extant, and despite a slow start it has my full interest now, thanks to a likeable protagonist, and a genuinely creepy, without being gruesome alien being. The idea of it being able to create the image of a lost loved one is superbly disturbing, even if I'd yet to completely figure out the plots. Harmon is an intriguing character, and I love little Ethan, the so very human robot child, and only hope he stays good.

I've finally started sticking with a season of Teen Wolf and genuinely enjoyed season four, despite some plot holes, due to an intriguing storyline. I loved the concept and mystery of the Deadpool list - and was completely shocked at who the Benefactor turned out to be, and loved seeing each character come into their own. Malia was a pleasant surprise, proving to be pretty cute and adorable, and I giggled through her scene of being so proud over her low grade at school. Braeden was another surprise, as I assumed the character would either die or turn evil, and instead found myself enjoying her story arc and romance with Derek which I'd never guessed I'd end up shipping. I loved how Argent came to terms with Allison's death as well as the Pack, and was okay with Peter's fitting fate. Kate's open ending was frustrating, though, and I can't help wishing they'd just killed her off. Derek was the best part, as usual. I loved seeing him come full circle and to terms with his heart and past, smiling more and forming relationships. While he had me terrified much of the season, I enjoyed seeing both child and human sides of him, but especially the beautiful transition into full and gorgeous wolf, my favorite twist of the season.

I finished season three of The Mod Squad and it was fabulous. I shriek a little inwardly every time Pete calls Julie "angel" and the two kissed in an episode - although sadly just as part of their cover. The trio's friendship is beautiful, as is their relationship with Captain Greer; I loved when he called Pete and Linc "his boys".

I discovered the amusing '80s sitcom Bosom Buddies and am loving it so far. The premise is outrageous but the guys's friendship and colorful side characters make it all works, and I love the theme and situations they manage to get themselves into.

I finished season two of Maverick and am still loving Bart best, as well as lamenting the fact that I seem to be the only one who prefers him to Bret. Bart, always the more serious and warmer in personality, gets all the best episodes, including the stunning "Prey Of The Cat" in which Bart gets put through the mental and physical wringer when a conniving woman falls for him, kills her own husband, and eventually winds up getting Bart nearly lynched for two murders. I found Raquel a fascinating, although tragic character in it, and Jack Kelly did an incredible job on the role, especially with Bart's tangible fear in the scene where he's locked in the cell as the mob comes into the jail. On a happier note, there's a new recurring character this season: the adorable scoundrel 'Gentleman' Jack Darby played by the always fabulous Richard Long, and he's both hilarious and completely perfect, gleefully playing off Bart with every quip.

I'm watching season two of The Courtship Of Eddie's Father now and it's every bit as adorable as last season. Tom and Eddie have the sweetest, most realistic father-son relationship ever, and I love all the other characters and the way they all relate.

I got a chance to watch the pilot of Young Hercules and loved it. As much as I love Ryan Gosling's Hercules Ian Bohen was even better, a perfect mixture of uncertainty and skill. Iolaus was flawless as usual, and I loved Jason's role. The plot was fun and unexpectedly poignant in places, especially due to a couple character deaths and Jason's fatal injury and healing with the golden fleece.

In new miniseries I watched Empire which for whatever historical embellishment more than makes up for it in beautiful scenes, intriguing people, and the stunning good looks of a super young and dark-eyed Santiago Cabrera. I was fascinated by Shakespeare's Julius Caesar so I got a little thrill during the Ides Of March prophesies near the beginning, then haunted by the tragedy of Caesar's death in the senate which plunged Rome into chaos. The only one to hear Caesar's dying wish, freed gladiator Tyrannus flees Rome with Octavius, Caesar's heir over the assumed successor Marc Antony. Hunted by assassins and betrayed by friends, Tyrannus attempts to teach Octavius all he knows in order to keep him alive and mold him into a great ruler, protecting him at the risk of his own life. I'm always drawn to the gladiators so it was no surprise that I loved Tyrannus, and the actor underplays the role wonderfully with most of his acting coming from his eyes and movements. Octavius is young and flawed but spirited and troubled enough that I cared about his journey, believable as the uncertain boy who suddenly finds himself growing up overnight. Brutus is a intriguing and conflicted traitor, and Julius Caesar, a deeply kind leader, has far too short a role.

I finally saw the 2013 miniseries of Anna Karenina and it was gorgeous, by far the best version over the other two I've tried. Everyone was perfectly cast, and the haunting feel of desperation over-shadowing Anna finally came out on the screen. Santiago Cabrera was gorgeous as usual, and I was very impressed by the actress who played Anna. I also loved that the film used the other characters more, and the setting and tone was beautiful. Also I gave a try to the '48 film and it was quite lovely, a well done version with beautiful, misty photography, and while I don't usually care for Vivien Leigh, her fragile looks and helpless style captured Anna well. I got chills when she describes her dream of how she'll die, and the recurring image of the old man by the train was incredibly powerful. The children were very believable, too, and little Sergei was adorable.

I finally saw Legion, which I'd been meaning to watch since I started Dominion, and while it initially took me a bit to warm up, I grew to love it. Paul Bettany was a wonderful Michael, very much like Tom Wisdom's portrayal, but with a bit less of a hardened edge, which is logical since he hasn't yet seen so much horror. The scene where he fights Gabriel and dies by his hand was haunting, and I loved his resurrection and beautiful, restored wings. Audrey was a sweet character, and I was saddened that she didn't survive the film, and I loved Jeep's quiet love for Charlie. Baby Alex was absolutely adorable, too.

I tried two Charles Dickens starting with the complex and lovely 1998 miniseries Our Mutual Friend. I've completely fallen in love with the wonderful Eugene Wrayburn who alternately made me smile, put stars in my eyes when he kissed Lizzie's hand, broke my heart, and put it back together again. He and Lizzie were beautiful together and while I loved the whole film their story was my favorite. The historical accuracy of BBC films never fails to impress me, and it felt like a time capsule of the 1860s, gorgeously filmed and acted. I also saw the lovely Martin Chuzzlewit which has some of my favorite Dickens characters including optimistic and cheerful Mark, sweet and caring Tom, kind-hearted and gentlemanly John, and impish waif Bailey. It was a perfect blend of hilarious comedy with Augustus's scenes and darker moments with Jonas, one of the few Dickens villains who makes my skin crawl. Everything had the wonderful, period feel; the only things I wish is that there was more of John and Ruth's and Mark and Mrs. Lupin's romances, as well as scenes instead of just a letter describing Martin's change of heart when he's ill in America and later has to care for Mark when he, too, becomes sick. But the actors were all perfect for their roles, and I adored seeing Peter Wingfield as John...such a different but just as heart-tugging role as the Sin Eater.

In theatres I saw The Giver and it far exceeded my expectations, making me both smile and cry several times. The world-building was fantastic, especially the unique choice of having the world and part of the film without color. The actors were all fabulous, and several scenes deeply moving, especially Giver's poignant speech toward the end, and Jonas's interactions with little Gabriel. I loved the gentle, slow-moving feel of the plot, even during action scenes, and the contrast of emotions Jonas learned to feel.

I discovered one more Charles Farrell film, the talkie After Tomorrow which impressed me a lot more than I'd been expecting. The story was realistic, brushed with a mix of adorable and tragic moments, and topped off with a very happy and unexpected ending. Charles Farrell was, as usual, wonderfully sweet, playing the innocent, faithful character he was so good and loveable as, and the whole cast was quite talented. Lacking more of his films I'm now watching the adorable series My Little Margie and loving it. Charles Farrell is wonderful as Margie's father, and Gale Storm is perfect as the ever mischievous Margie. In other new silent films I've discovered a love for Charlie Chaplin. I watched The Kid which was adorable, and fell in love with his character as well as his adorable father-son relationship with little John. Their scenes together were wonderful, and I loved the happy ending. After that was the flawless City Lights, a perfect mesh of hilarious comedy and bittersweet romance which made me completely adore Charlie Chaplin. The story was poignant and deeply touching and I wished it'd been a bit longer to ensure a completely happy ending.

In new films this week I watched the wonderful Lemony Snicket's A Series Of Unfortunate Events which was a perfect blend of bittersweet and hilarious, all with a zany, quirky, turn of the century feel that instantly made me adore it. I loved how imaginative the story was, with dry humor, poignant and lovely moments, and loveable characters, such as little biting Sunny or the hilarious Aunt Josephine and her fears of everything. Violet and Klaus were easy to root for, and I loved the three children's relationship and how they looked after each other. Next I saw the gorgeous Bridge To Terabithia, a flawless, heartbreaking story with a very familiar cast: Josh Hutcherson as bullied little loner Jess, Annasophia Robb from Samantha as the imaginative Leslie, adorable little Bailee Madison from Saving Sarah Cain as Jess's darling sister May Belle, and Robert Patrick from The X-Files as Jess's strict yet not unloving father. The plot was beautifully sad, rich in imagination, and I loved the world Jess and Leslie created, even if I've never cried so hard during a film. The ending was poignant yet lovely, with May Belle entering Terabithia as their new princess, and I adored her relationship with Jess, as well as the twists and turns in the plot such as the bully finally standing up for Jess against the other bullies. Josh Hutcherson was wonderful as Jess, with just the right amount of childish awe and world-weary sadness to make me love him. Following that I watched the clever and imaginative Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief, a modern twist on Greek mythology with a likeable bunch of heroes, especially the funny satyr Grover. I loved the way it tied the myths to what was happening in the teen's lives, and the unusual aspects such as Percy's dyslexia being the fact that he can read ancient Greek. Then I saw Becoming Jane, a gorgeous and poignant biography of Jane Austen's early years and her first and only love. Anne Hathaway was perfect as Jane, and James McAvoy was wonderful as Tom, a bit of a rogue but loveable. It was beautifully filmed and directed, and I teared up at the ending, so sad yet lovely. Next was The Spiderwick Chronicles, an enchantingly imaginative fantasy with fairies and an adorable little brownie that made me feel like a kid. The story was fun, I teared up at the bittersweet ending with Lucinda and her father, and I loved the talented cast, especially the children. Then I saw Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and loved how much it was like Alias Smith and Jones with their banter, the safecracking, Etta reminding me so much of Clementine, and just the feel of the film in general. Butch and Sundance had a wonderful close, yet easy friendship, and the humor is gently underplayed beneath a feel of dread; you can actually feel the time running out, driving them to toward the ending which gives the film a bittersweet feel. I loved the attention to detail and use of sepiatone filming and pictures within the film, as well as the theme, "Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head", which I've always loved. The ending completely broke me, though, not that I wasn't expecting it, but it was heartbreaking to actually see it, even though it was beautifully, poignantly filmed. Next was the gorgeous The Eagle, a flawless and beautiful film with loads of friendship, whump, and all other elements I love, as well as being set in the time period of Hadrian's Wall which made me giddy from the beginning. I loved Marcus saving Esca in the arena by yelling at the people to turn their thumbs down into thumbs up, a selfless act that turns into an enduring friendship of equals instead of simply master and slave. I loved how Esca saves him in the end, and him being set free yet still remaining with him in the end. It was a wonderful story, too, and I loved every moment of it. Following that was The Patriot, a guilty pleasure since I love the Revolutionary War, and it was both stunning and completely heartbreaking, with lovely photography and superb acting, making me cry and yet giving me moments that were heartwarming, such as little Susan speaking, or the soldier naming his son after Gabriel. The film reminded me a lot of Shenandoah though, which both made me happy and intrigued me. Then I saw the 2004 version of The Phantom Of The Opera, a utterly gorgeous and breathtakingly haunting film that made me cry. I loved both Raoul for his selflessness and determination to save Christine as well as the tragic Phantom for his deep love and sadness, and frankly would have been happy for Christine to end up with either. Still the ending made me burst into tears I'd been holding back the whole film. The music was glorious, especially "Music Of The Night", always my favorite, and the acting and direction were simply stunning. Next was the surprisingly excellent Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes, a stunningly poignant and thought-provoking film that was also deeply moving. I wasn't expecting much and was completely blown away by it. James Franco continues to impress me with the sensitivity of his acting, and his relationship with Caesar was beautifully done. The scenes where Caesar spoke were powerful and I loved the message of the film as well as all the nods to the original. Then I saw Tron: Legacy, an incredibly imaginative and fabulous sci-fi with a richly detailed cyborg world all inside a computer. I loved Sam - a perfectly cast Garrett Hedlund - and the jaw-dropping special effects. I discovered Heidi's wonderful sequel Courage Mountain and completely fell in love with it. While this Heidi took a while to grow on me I instantly took to Peter, mostly because he's quite close to what I imagine the child Peter looking like and acting like grown up. I loved the parallels between the films, such as Heidi having to save Peter from falling off the cliff, and the lovely new additions like Peter giving Heidi his panpipes to remember him while she's away. The best part of all, though, was seeing a pairing I've loved since I was seven truly and really become canon. Peter and Heidi were perfect together, even kissing, hugging, and promising to wait until Peter returns from the war, and I was melting with happiness through every moment. Next was The Last King Of Scotland, a gritty but fascinating historical drama. Nicholas was a very human protagonist, and the events surrounding and involving him were both disturbing and very interesting, opening my eyes to a part of history I'd never heard of. After that was Atonement, and while it didn't impress me as much as I'd hoped it was still a gorgeously filmed movie, especially the breathtaking and heartwrenching war scenes such as Dunkirk or Robbie discovering the dead girls. I never felt like I got to know the characters very well, but I still cared enough about them, especially the tragic Bryony, to be interested in their fate. The final twist stunned me, leaving the film with a bittersweet and haunting conclusion. Next was the 1990 version of Treasure Island, a remarkably faithful adaptation with the always wonderful Christian Bale as Jim. I liked that Jim was more of a fighter and saved everyone unlike the more childish Jim from the Disney version, but I missed the warm relationship between the Doctor and he which was considerably toned down. While I felt it needed a little more fun in the plot, it was still a well-done film, and I loved the period details and sea-faring adventure. Next was September Dawn, a heartbreaking and beautifully old-fashioned film about the Mountain Meadows Massacre. It's a historical event I've been interested in for a long time and I liked the feel and style of the film, capturing the tragedy in a star-crossed romance and a mixture of people I grew to love or hate. Jonathan was especially fascinating and played by a very talented actor, and the nearly black-and-white contrast between the two groups was refreshing and unusual, more like an old film. Then was Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time, a fantastic and ridiculously fun movie with shades of One Thousand and One Arabian Nights which I've loved all my life. I'm not familiar with the actor but he was amazing as Dastan, the street orphan turned prince, and both he and the boy who played him as a child would be perfect in a live-action version of Aladdin. I loved the concept of the time-turning-back dagger and sand, and there were more than enough acrobatics to keep me entertained. I was a little sad that Tamina didn't remember him in the end, but the fact that she was alive and that they were together made me too happy to worry about it. Next was Noah which was gorgeous, with a fascinating, fresh look at the story while sticking close enough for comfort. The scene of the animals coming to the ark was breath-taking, and the cinematography was stunning throughout. I loved the idea of the evil character being seen by Noah as the snake, and the flood's start was exactly as I imagine. I loved Shem and Ila's story, how they met, their love for each other and their children, and they being the ones to start the world over. Noah was quite different than I imagine, and there were times I didn't exactly like him, even if I understood his motives, but he was quite human and easy to relate to. Naamah was excellent, given the depth she always lacks, and little Japheth was precious. Only Ham felt miscast, despite Logan Lerman doing a good job at the role. After hearing about it for so many years I finally saw Kiss Of Death and surprisingly loved it. Film noir has never been my favorite genre but this film more than makes up for it by crafting an easy to follow plot with good characters that are easy to warm to. Victor Mature is excellent as always as the anti-hero, and I adored getting to see him play a husband and father with two adorable little girls, for a change. Richard Widmark was creepy and good as always, although I was expecting more from his role due to the hype I've always heard surrounding his performance. I loved the hopeful ending, and setting of the movie. After that was a rare Glenn Ford film I hadn't yet seen: A Stolen Life. Bette Davis was surprisingly excellent at the dual role, portraying both sisters as so unique she had me easily convinced she was two different people. Glenn Ford was lovely, even if his character was a bit naive, and it was a treat to see him so young. Next was Priest, a film of gorgeous cinematography and amazing world-building with a superb twist on vampires. I loved the gadget-filled, 1800s like world, the distinct cross markings on their faces, and the bikes. All the characters, from Priest himself, to Hicks, to Lucy were fabulous, and I was saddened to not find a sequel resolving Priest and Priestess's unrequited love, as well as seeing Priest getting to know his daughter. I'm starting to love Karl Urban's roles so I watched Pathfinder, a unique tale of a Viking child taken in by an Indian tribe who grows to be an adult to defend them against a second invasion. Karl Urban was wonderful as Ghost, and I loved his relationships with his adoptive mother and sister - their deaths broke me - as well as Starfire. The ending was lovely. After that was The Pianist, an utterly heartbreaking and gorgeous true story of a Holocaust survivor. Adrien Brody was absolutely stunning - he certainly deserved that oscar - and the story made me tear up so many times. Next was the delightful Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. I loved the world and visuals, as well as the romance. Next was the offbeat but intriguing Suddenly Last Summer. Next was I Confess, an excellent and interesting Hitchcock. Next was the delightfully shippy Children of Dune and its awesome world-building and glowy eyes. Next was On the Waterfront, always excellent, and the iconic The Wild One. Next was the visually lovely City of Ember. Next was the surprisingly enjoyable Alexander. Next was The Legend of Hercules, a flawed but highly enjoyable version of the myth. Next was the fun and random fairytale adventure Ella Enchanted. Next was the Pirates of the Caribbean which despite a slow start quickly won me over. Next was the enjoyable and lovely The Story of Alexander Graham Bell. Last was the Kiwi adventure Doom Runners which I enjoyed greatly, despite it definitely being a kids' movie, probably because of Dean O'Gorman.

In new superhero films I watched The Amazing Spiderman 2 but despite some excellent moments and early humor it seemed disconnected and over-filled. This Peter isn't easy for me to relate to but he seemed better last film, more human and awkward instead of annoying and never serious. Gwen and his breakup seemed random and simply to add more heartbreak, and Harry, the character I was most looking forward to was completely ruined, turned into a whining, strange kid whose transformation into the green Goblin made little sense, even if his appearance was creepy and fascinating. Gwen's death was tragic and completely heart-wrenching, making the best scene, sadly, in the entire film. The ending seemed abrupt and out of place, with Peter reverting too quickly to his joking persona without giving another thought to Gwen and too much was left hanging.

I finally saw Dr. Horrible's Sing Along Blog and surprisingly loved it, both for the music as well as the plot. The sadness of the ending was a shock but I liked the origin of the bad guy feel to the story, even if the last moments left it hanging for a sequel.
 
 
feeling: mischievous
calliope tune: "Lover's Cross"-Jim Croce
 
 
Kathleen
11 May 2012 @ 11:04 pm
Title: Damnatio Memoriae
Fandom: Hercules: the Legendary Journeys
Summary: There were some who said, even as boys, that Iolaus balanced the halves of god and human in Hercules. And once he was gone there was no one to steady the scales.
Genre: tragedy, drama
Characters: Hercules, Jason, Iphicles, Niobe, Nemesis, the Fates, Persephone, Zeus
Pairings: none
Warnings: season five AU, violence

Whenever I lost sight of what we were fighting for, Iolaus reminded me through his own courage and strength. I don't know what his life would have been like without me, but I can't imagine my life without him. )
 
 
feeling: determined
calliope tune: "On The Border"-Al Stewart